Ala Vaikunthapurramuloo movie review: Allu Arjun and Trivikram Srinivas entertain us again

Manoj Kumar R
Ala Vaikunthapurramuloo review

Ala Vaikunthapurramuloo movie review: The set up of the film is very similar to the director-actor duo's 2012 movie Julayi.

Ala Vaikunthapurramuloo movie cast: Allu Arjun, Pooja Hegde, Tabu, Jayaram
Ala Vaikunthapurramuloo movie director: Trivikram Srinivas
Ala Vaikunthapurramuloo movie rating: 3 stars

In director Trivikram Srinivas' Ala Vaikunthapurramuloo, the protagonist Bantu (Allu Arjun) hails from a middle-class family. He has a doting mother, an affectionate younger sister and a forever nagging father. The set up of the film is very similar to the director-actor duo's 2012 movie Julayi.

In Julayi, Ravi's father constantly nagged him as he was genuinely worried about his son's future. But, Bantu's father Valmiki (Murali Sharma in top form) has sadistic reasons behind the way he behaves with his son.

Like his previous films, Trivikram has also taken inspiration for Ala Vaikunthapurramuloo from Ramayana. It is clear from the names of the characters in the movie. Valmiki, for example, is considered as the author of epic Ramayana. It is Murali Sharma's Valmiki, the most ill-willed and immoral character in this drama, who sets the ball rolling. The story begins when Valmiki cruelly alters the lives of people around him.

The movie opens with Valmiki swapping his baby boy with Ramachandra's (Jayaram) newborn boy. Ramachandra was his colleague earlier, and now he is his boss after he married the daughter of the company's founder. Ramachandra's growth has been killing Valmiki from inside. He switches the babies to ensure his son has a life that he never had and the life that he could never give him. It also allows him to take out all his ill-will against Ramachandra on his son. Trivikram is wise enough to know that Valmiki's evil plot is just a seed. He reveals it at the very beginning of the film without holding it back for the suspense.

The premise, plot, conflict and emotions of this film have already been handled by Trivikram in his previous film. The question is, what can he do differently about it in the latest outing? The main pleasures of Ala Vaikunthapurramuloo are not unravelling of the secrets that the characters are determined to carry to their graves. It is Trivikram's writing and his intention to tell a story and entertain the audience without any rush.