Alcohol-Free Hand Sanitisers: The Start of a Trend

Vidya Kanekar
Alcohol-Free Hand Sanitisers: The Start of a Trend

Hand sanitisers have been used throughout human healthcare to decrease illnesses in the population. They were previously used almost exclusively in hospitals and maternity wards for protection against almost all types of germs and bacteria. Their ease and effectiveness have made them a reliable baby-safe and pregnancy-safe option.

Hand sanitisers are convenient and beneficial, especially in places where hand-washing facilities are not available. However, most of the parents have seemed to take this habit home from the hospital and made it a daily practice. Overuse of hand sanitisers for kids has become a widespread phenomenon and can lead to a greater incidence of immunity issues and dry skin in infants.

The most widely used component that makes sanitisers a harmful hand hygiene solution is alcohol.

Why Avoid Alcohol

There are two different types of hand sanitisers, alcohol-based ones, and non-alcohol-based ones. Alcohol is the prime ingredient used in hand sanitisers to fight off the germs instantly from our hands. It disrupts the cell membrane, essentially dissolving the bacteria and germs on our hands. It's typically considered pregnancy-safe, in that it can destroy a wide range of bacteria and protect expectant mothers from illnesses.

While they provide a health benefit in terms of hand hygiene, alcohol-based hand sanitisers can be bad for your kids in the long run, especially if not used correctly. Frequent use of alcohol-based hand sanitisers can dry out your infant's skin and make it less healthy. In addition, alcohol-based hand sanitisers not only kill germs but kill off natural and good bacteria as well, leading to reduced immunity. Using alcohol-based hand sanitisers in childhood can, thus, cause allergies and other health issues later in life.

Getting a hand sanitiser with low alcohol content is not a baby-safe solution, either. You should use at least 60% alcohol-based sanitisers to have any real effect on disease-causing microbes and bacteria. So if your hand sanitiser does not have a high enough concentration, it will be ineffective in killing germs.

In addition, studies have shown that, due to their high alcohol content, these sanitisers can be harmful if ingested accidentally. Just a few drops of an alcohol-based sanitiser, if allowed to get in contact with the mouth, can cause alcohol poisoning in babies.

As long as it's the correct amount and allowed to dry, alcohol-based hand sanitisers can be used to practice proper hand hygiene and provide germ prevention for kids. Still, to be on the safe side, using alcohol-free hand sanitisers for babies that are toxin-free and baby-safe is your best bet in fighting off infections.

Non-Alcohol-Based Hand Sanitisers

If you are looking for a baby-safe option to remove dirt and germs from the hands, it is generally recommended to use natural and organic hand sanitisers with no alcohol content. Non-alcohol-based hand sanitisers are, from most medical and scientific perspectives,  better than alcohol-based ones. Here's a rundown of how they can help you:

  • They are toxin-free and safe for infant and child use.
  • They give your body the chance to build natural resistance to germs and improve immunity.
  • They do not leave your hands drier after use, thus ensuring new germs aren't allowed to grow.
  • They are a gentle alternative for those who suffer from sensitive skin.
  • Most non-alcoholic hand sanitisers contain vegetarian ingredients and are cruelty-free.


Takeaway

Hand sanitisers have undoubtedly become a popular first choice for moms-to-be and new mothers alike. Because your child's health is always your first and foremost priority, pay attention to the ingredients in your baby-care products. Use natural hand sanitisers to ensure complete germ protection for your baby.

Check out Baby Chakra's Pure Natural Hand Sanitiser, India's first and only baby-safe sanitising solution.

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