BBC Breakfast host Bill Turnbull to try cannabis for cancer documentary

Albertina Lloyd
Entertainment reporter, Yahoo UK
Bill Turnbull was diagnosed with cancer in 2017 (Credit: Getty Images)

Former BBC Breakfast host Bill Turnbull is to try cannabis as part of a documentary featuring the treatments available to cancer sufferers.

The 63-year-old news presenter revealed last March he had been diagnosed with incurable prostate cancer in 2017 which ahd spread to his his legs, hips, pelvis after he ignored the symptoms.

He will now present Bill Turnbull: Staying Alive which will air on Channel 4 next month and charts his life since being diagnosed.

A source told The Sun: “This documentary shows Bill’s willing to do anything in a bid to beat the disease.

“In this case it includes him trying a treatment which is considered unconventional - and even controversial. But there is much more to the show, including showing the effect his cancer has had on his family.”

Read more: Stars offer love and support to Bill Turnbull

Cannabis-derived products are believed to alleviate pain for patients. After years of being dismissed as an illegal drug, medication containing the active ingredients from cannabis are being prescribed by specialist doctors.

The documentary will also see Turner interview fellow BBC journalists - political reporter Nick Robinson and newsreader Sian Williams - about their own cancer battles, as well actor, writer and comedian Stepehn Fry, who announced last year he had been treated for prostate cancer.

Turnbull appeared on the The Great Celebrity Bake Off for Stand Up to Cancer last year, during which he spoke openly about his cancer diagnosis.

Speaking to Radio Times, he said “Maybe if I’d got it earlier and stopped it at the prostate, I’d be in a much better state,” he says.

“The GP said, ‘It’s clear you have prostate cancer and that it’s spread to the bone.’ And all of a sudden you’re in this dark chasm.”

Read more: Prostate Cancer: Symptoms To Look Out For

The Classic FM presenter added:“Those first few days were probably the worst days of my life.”

“The worst thing is, you carry it through the day and then you go to bed at night and wake up in the morning and it comes to you again. I have got cancer. I’ve still got cancer. It wasn’t a bad dream. And that takes a lot of dealing with.”