Does fame command more respect than an individual?

life positive, fame and respect, is fame important, how does fame affect life, Simon Sinek, Damodar Mall, Indian Express, Indian Express news

Does fame supersede who you are as an individual? (Source: Getty/Thinkstock)

What is the price of fame? And does it supersede who you are as an individual? It is often said that you are as important as your fame. If you are a person of interest, holding a powerful position, you will command respect. And the sad reality is no one is actually interested in who you are as a person. Your personal beliefs and individualistic traits take a backseat when you gain popularity. And when you lose it, the world moves on fast.

The thing is, fame does not, and must not change you. You continue to be the person you are. There is no existential crisis. And deep inside, you know what sets you apart. Your achievements and positions may define you today, but they are not the ultimate benchmarks in life.

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Reliance Retail CEO Damodar Mall shares this very important video on this Twitter feed, weighing in on the downside of fame. "...people do not talk to the king. They talk to the sword or the throne! I always ask myself, ‘how many people will listen to me, minus my visiting card’?!" he writes.

In the video, motivational speaker Simon Sinek expertly draws a parallel between fame and respect, by citing the example of a man who, during his tenure as an undersecretary of defense was treated with a lot of admiration and respect, when he was invited to give a speech at a large conference. He was flown in business class, taken to his hotel, served coffee in a beautiful ceramic cup.

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When his tenure ended, he had no one running after him. He took his own transport, checked into and carried his luggage to the hotel himself, and poured himself coffee in a Styrofoam cup. The lesson being, the ceramic cup was never meant for him; it was meant for the position he held. He always deserved the Styrofoam cup, Sinek says.