Of fitted kitchens and architecture in new Frankfurt Old Town

Bauhaus architecture

The Bauhaus elegance is extensively viewed as one of the creation’s most momentous architectonic movements, swaying modern architecture, art and design far yonder Germany’s borders.

BAKSHISH DEAN is in awe of Bauhaus-styled fitted kitchens and architecture in New Frankfurt Old TownThe essential idea behind Bauhaus was to symphonically syndicate architecture, art and handcraft, resultant in a solitary structural masterpiece.

Locals and tourists like me are certainly acquainted with the Frankfurt’s contemporary skyline and the Römerberg old town centre. But not many know of the ‘New Frankfurt’. This lodging plan was correspondingly significant in affecting the cityscape of the city on the River Main.

In awe of the fitted kitchen (pic 1)

I have heard of the fitted kitchen and I am curios, so I set off with a guide to a couple of Bauhaus-styled residential estates. The Römerstadt and the Ernst May Show-House, home of the world’s very first series-produced fitted kitchen – are two further, predominantly exciting examples of the Bauhaus style.

The Ernst May Show-House and the so-called ‘Frankfurt Kitchen’ are open to visitors from Tuesdays to Thursdays, 11:00 am to 4:00 pm, as well as Saturdays and Sundays from 12:00 pm to 5:00 pm.

An architect named Margarete Schütte-Lihotzky advanced the exceedingly practical and space-saving kitchen, which was intended at gathering the appealing demands of ‘The New Construction’ of the 1920s. What it in fact did was to transform the design and cohesive features of the contemporary kitchen.

A visible feature is the panel of metal storing ampoules for non-perishable supplies. There were no electronic fridges at the time, but a low-level closet was emitted from the outside to keep food cool.

The steaming board was hinged to the wall and could be pulled down to use. Even the discarding of trash was considered: the dust bin was in its individual cabinet that could be emptied from exterior of the kitchen in the hall.

The Frankfurt kitchen

The Frankfurt City Museum, located in the old town’s brand-new museum quarter, also magnets thoughtfulness to the Frankfurt Kitchen in its enduring exhibition, entitled ‘Frankfurt Once?’!Needless to add being a chef this is an opportunity for me to get a closer look at yet another version of the famous Frankfurt Kitchen.

The so-called Frankfurt Kitchen 1920 should be considered as portion of a modernist power to make all features of everyday life extra rational, competent and hygienic, and not as much of time consuming. It was the first fitted kitchen and the example for all ensuing integral kitchens. In its day it was extensively revealed in Germany and abroad, and a film was even made about it in 1928.

Lunch with a view

All this walking around and looking at kitchens, makes me hungry. I notice a restaurant called Oosten right beside the river Main. My fabulous lunch is convoyed by a whimsical sight of the skyscraper backdrop of the Frankfurt Financial District. Oosten is not just a restaurant but also an occasion location, on 3 levels.

If it wasn’t for the enjoyable meal alone, I can unquestionably merely reappear for the views and a stroll in the area. I particularly liked the summer salad with gratinated feta, pine nuts and cranberries.

In terms of taste, all the components of the salad did fit flawlessly together, the leaf salad, the velvety feta, the sweet-smelling cranberries and the crunchy pine nuts synchronised to an impeccable dish.

And of course who can resist the ‘CurryWurst’ when in Germany! Stomach happy, I decide to go back to my hotel for a rest, so I am fresh for some bar hopping…after all it’s my last evening in the city!