Greggs is stockpiling bacon and tuna over no-deal Brexit food shortage fears

Greggs is stockpiling for a no-deal Brexit. Photo: PA / Greggs handout

Greggs (GRG.L) is stockpiling ingredients such as bacon and tuna ahead of a possible no-deal Brexit.

Roger Whiteside, chief executive of Britain’s biggest bakery chain, confirmed it has “organised storage space” to stockpile bacon and tuna among other longer-shelf life items, should Brexit disrupt the “flow of goods” into the UK.

“Should there be any short-term disruption at ports, we will be able to last a few days while that goes on and then hopefully it will settle down,” he told the Financial Times.

READ MORE: Government fears no-deal Brexit could lead to prison riots

The company made similar preparations ahead of the original March Brexit deadline.

Experts have warned that a no-deal Brexit could result in food and medicine shortages. Meanwhile, the government has refused to provide details of potential supply disruptions on the grounds that it could “damage negotiations” with the EU.

“We are preparing for the potential impact of the UK’s departure from the European Union by building stocks of key ingredients and equipment that could be affected by disruption to the flow of goods into the UK,” the company said in a statement, as part of its third quarter trading update.

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The report also showed Greggs’s sales jumped 12.4% in the third quarter of the year, with like-for-like sales in company-managed shops up 7.4%.

Meanwhile, total sales were up 13.9% over nine months, while like-for-like sales increased 9.4%.

The company has also announced plans to trial later opening hours, and an extended range of “post-4pm” deals to attract customers.

READ MORE: No-deal Brexit could force supermarkets to ration as shelves “quickly” empty

Deals include a £2 pizza plus drink offer, as well as a new hot menu meal deal, which will be made up of any hot sandwich or chicken goujons, plus potato wedges and a drink for just £4.

Following trials of a delivery service, the company said it was “encouraged” and is now “developing the operational processes to service this channel.”