Gwyneth Paltrow predicts psychedelics will be the next 'big' wellness trend

Sabrina Barr
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Gwyneth Paltrow predicts psychedelics will be the next 'big' wellness trend

Gwyneth Paltrow predicts psychedelics will be the next 'big' wellness trend

Gwyneth Paltrow has predicted the next big health trend will be psychedelics.

The actor and entrepreneur launched lifestyle brand Goop in 2008.

Since then, Paltrow has courted controversy on several occasions with her views on wellness, denying in October 2018 that her company is based on "pseudoscience".

In a recent interview with The New York Times, the Shakespeare in Love actor was asked what she believes will be regarded as the "next big thing", following on from the increased popularity of gluten-free diets in recent years.

"I think how psychedelics affect health and mental health and addiction will come more into the mainstream," Paltrow responded.

The businesswoman was then asked whether she's ever tried psychedelics before.

While Paltrow admitted that she's never tried psychedelics as she's "terrified" at the idea, she did express fascination in the effect the class of drug can have on the mind.

"I mean there's undeniably some link between being in that state and being connected to some other universal cosmic something," she stated.

In 2018, a study conducted by researchers at the University of California found that psychedelic drugs including LSD and MDMA have been shown to stimulate the growth of new branches between brain cells, which could help address mental health conditions such as depression and addiction.

As the conversation about psychedelics continued in the interview, Paltrow expressed interest in ibogaine, a psychoactive substance found in the roots of a plant in Gabon, a country located on the west coast of Africa.

When asked whether ibogaine would, in her opinion, become a more widespread psychoactive substance in the near future, the actor said: "I don't know. Don't take my word for it."

Between 1990 and 2008, 19 deaths were reported as having been associated with ingestion of ibogaine, the Global Ibogaine Therapy Alliance (GITA) states.

These deaths were also attributed to other factors, including pre-existing heart conditions and the use of other drugs at the same time.

GITA explains that ibogaine therapy could prove beneficial as a form of treatment for those suffering from substance abuse.

"In general, ibogaine can be administered safely and without incident, especially when done with proper preparation and supervision," the organisation says.

"However, there two interrelated issues have stood in the way of further development of ibogaine as a prescription treatment: the lack of clinical research, and the issue of safety."

Drug Wise UK outlines that ibogaine is currently in the process of being tested to see if it can be used to treat opiate and stimulant dependency.