One in four men feel cracking sexual jokes at workplace is acceptable: Survey

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Some men still feel that it is okay to crack jokes of sexual nature in the presence of a female colleague, survey reveals. (Source: Getty/Thinkstock)

Around the world, almost 28 per cent of men, that is roughly one in four men, think that it is all right to crack jokes of a sexual nature inside a workplace, in the presence of women, a new survey has revealed. In comparison, only 16 per cent of women have said that such jokes are acceptable.

The survey was conducted on 20,000 people belonging to 27 countries, by the Global Institute for Women's Leadership at King's College, London, with market research firm Ipsos MORI. While workplace etiquette continues to be discussed in light of the #MeToo movement around the world, this survey has highlighted how some people continue to keep up with toxic and unacceptable behaviour.

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The survey also revealed that globally 52 per cent of men and 41 per cent of women feel it is okay to ask a colleague out on a date. And while 26 per cent of respondents said that rejecting a colleague's proposal can damage a woman's career, only seven per cent said the same about a man's professional prospects. More than one in eight men, or some 13 per cent of respondents, said that it is okay to display material of sexual nature at work, as opposed to the seven per cent of women who said the same.

sexual jokes, workplace, survey, indian express news

The survey also revealed that globally 52 per cent of men and 41 per cent of women feel it is okay to ask a colleague out on a date. (Source: Getty/Thinkstock)

Additionally, nearly 14 per cent think that a woman who talks about her family life is likely to jeopardise her career, as against the six per cent of people who believe the same about men. Also, while 71 per cent of Russians said they are confident about confronting a man who is seen harassing a woman in public, in comparison only 29 per cent of Japanese and 31 per cent of South Koreans said the same.

The people of Sweden, South Africa and Spain are more likely to call out a senior colleague at the workplace for their sexist comments. The people of France, Japan and Poland are least likely to do it, the study said.

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While it is great that the dialogue around workplace harassment and equality continues, as a world, we still have a long way to go before offices become more female-friendly. The aforementioned numbers and percentages suggest that the people who make workplaces toxic are in the minority, but they are still significant.