• William Shakespeare's birthday: How the Bard bade farewell through Prospero and The Tempest
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    The Independent

    William Shakespeare's birthday: How the Bard bade farewell through Prospero and The Tempest

    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), perhaps the finest mind to ever put quill to parchment, is famously thought to have been born and died on the same date - 23 April. This Monday therefore simultaneously marks the 454th birthday of the Bard of Avon and the 402nd anniversary of his death. Shakespeare was 52 when he was laid to rest at the Church of the Holy Trinity in his hometown of Stratford-upon-Avon, Warwickshire, leaving behind 154 sonnets and the 39 tragedies, histories and comedies that continue to dominate the world's theatrical stages to this day.

  • Dale Winton: Police to investigate TV presenter's death after friend says he 'hadn't been in a good place for a long time'
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    The Independent

    Dale Winton: Police to investigate TV presenter's death after friend says he 'hadn't been in a good place for a long time'

    The death of the much loved television presenter Dale Winton at his home in London is being treated as “unexplained” by police. Police are making enquiries after the TV personality – who is famed for fronting game show series like Supermarket Sweep and the National Lottery’s In It To Win It – died at his home aged 62 on Wednesday. A spokesperson for the Metropolitan Police told The Independent they do not currently believe the death to be suspicious.

  • Rose Wylie, Lolita's House, David Zwirner London, review: Few painters are more arrestingly, pleasingly odd
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    The Independent

    Rose Wylie, Lolita's House, David Zwirner London, review: Few painters are more arrestingly, pleasingly odd

    One way in, since you were asking, might be to find words to describe the particular brush strokes that Rose Wylie seems to use. There are few painters more arrestingly odd than Wylie, and it took a while for a big gallery to notice quite how pleasingly odd she was, and what it all amounted to. This is her second show at David Zwirner over in Mayfair, but her first wasn't much of a show at all, so you could call it her first without over-masticating the truth.

  • Javier Bardem 'shocked' by Woody Allen treatment: 'I have doubts'
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    The Independent

    Javier Bardem 'shocked' by Woody Allen treatment: 'I have doubts'

    Javier Bardem has jumped to the defence of Woody Allen despite allegations the director assaulted his adopted daughter when she was a child. The actor, who starred in Allen's film Vicky Cristina Barcelona (2008), shunned criticism faced by the filmmaker telling French publication Paris Match he's “absolutely not” ashamed to have worked with him. “If there was evidence that Woody Allen was guilty, then yes, I would have stopped working with him, but I have doubts," People reports Bardem as saying.

  • Dale Winton death: Supermarket Sweep and In It To Win It presenter lauded as 'the perfect host'
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    The Independent

    Dale Winton death: Supermarket Sweep and In It To Win It presenter lauded as 'the perfect host'

    Dale Winton, who has died aged 62, has been described by fellow celebrities as “kind and mischievous”, “such a gent” and “the perfect host”. Tributes poured in for the TV presenter known for fronting game show series like Supermarket Sweep and the National Lottery‘s In It To Win It. “It is with great sadness that we can confirm the passing of Dale Winton who died at home earlier today," he said in a statement.

  • Blue Planet: Plankton species named after Sir David Attenborough's BBC series
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    The Independent

    Blue Planet: Plankton species named after Sir David Attenborough's BBC series

    Sir David Attenborough has heaped praise on the fact a species of plankton has been named in honour of the BBC’s Blue Planet series. Scientists at University College London (UCL) gave the honour to Sir David and the documentary team for the series which was dubbed "the first ever comprehensive series on the natural history of the world's oceans". It is thought to be the first time a species has been named after a TV show.

  • Rio Azul, Beatriz Milhazes, White Cube Bermondsey, London, review: Visually seductive, slightly vertigo-inducing
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    The Independent

    Rio Azul, Beatriz Milhazes, White Cube Bermondsey, London, review: Visually seductive, slightly vertigo-inducing

    The work of Brazilian painter and collagiste Beatriz Milhazes treads a fine line between the cerebral (and occasionally even visually austere) impulses of modernism, and the untutored, celebratory, colour-saturated excess of folk art as it spills in the direction of carnival. This new show, the first in London for a decade, brings together paintings, collage, sculpture, and a giant tapestry, 16m across, made at the Aubusson factory in France. Every painting in this show, Milhazes said, as her eyes wheeled around the gallery in a slightly intoxicated state of self-bewilderment, is a unique result of a mathematical dream.

  • Instructions for Correct Assembly, Royal Court, London, review: Astute dystopian satire
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    The Independent

    Instructions for Correct Assembly, Royal Court, London, review: Astute dystopian satire

    “I thought that we could have a go at it together, you know like we did with the upstairs bed?” says Hari (Mark Bonnar) to his wife Max (Jane Horrocks). “You said I was the Susan Boyle of DIY,” she remembers, looking chuffed. It involves screwing together a bewildering jumble of plastic and metal body parts, to say nothing of mastering the chip at the back of the skull or getting the hang of the remote control that can adjust attitudes.

  • Palmyra, Eurohouse, Battersea Arts Centre, London, review: A smashing double-bill that will haunt you
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    The Independent

    Palmyra, Eurohouse, Battersea Arts Centre, London, review: A smashing double-bill that will haunt you

    Bertrand Lesca is tall, handsome and French, confident that his easy charm will work on us. Nasi Voutsas is smaller, Greek and has the large, pitiable eyes of a whipped puppy. There's mutual aggression built into the top dog/underdog dynamic of almost all double acts but in the work of this pair, brilliant physical clowning escalates into ferocious power games.

  • Voices of America, Sadler's Wells, London, review: William Forsythe takes the English National Ballet clubbing
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    The Independent

    Voices of America, Sadler's Wells, London, review: William Forsythe takes the English National Ballet clubbing

    A joyful surprise: in his new work for English National Ballet, William Forsythe takes the company clubbing. Forsythe, one of the world’s most influential choreographers, is very much the star of this programme of works by American artists. Both the new work and Approximate Sonata show Forsythe enjoying ballet, its grandeur and its agility, with ENB’s dancers soaring to meet the challenges he sets them.

  • R Lee Ermey dead: 'Full Metal Jacket' sergeant actor dies aged 74
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    The Independent

    R Lee Ermey dead: 'Full Metal Jacket' sergeant actor dies aged 74

    R Lee Ermey, a former Marine who made a career in Hollywood playing hard-nosed military men like Gunnery Sgt. Hartman in Stanley Kubrick's "Full Metal Jacket," has died. Ermey's longtime manager Bill Rogin says he died Sunday morning from pneumonia-related complications. Rage, rage against the dying of the light," Modine wrote, quoting the Dylan Thomas poem.

  • New York: A photographic celebration of NYC's architecture and street life
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    The Independent

    New York: A photographic celebration of NYC's architecture and street life

    New York can be frightening just by its size and number of people, or it can be exhilarating for the same reasons. Dutch photographer Richard Koek was compelled to come to New York. Many photographers have to travel in order to be able to photograph.

  • TV preview, Famalam (BBC3): A sublime achievement of satire
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    The Independent

    TV preview, Famalam (BBC3): A sublime achievement of satire

    Such is the sublime achievement of Famalam (street slang for close friends and family, I believe), and its all-black cast. Thus, although I have never knowingly watched a Nollywood movie, the absurdly low production values and abysmal moral values of the Nigerian entertainment industry are sent up reliably every week, courtesy of the Famalam team’s “Fantastic Egusi” studios, which specialises in gaudy graphics and clankingly unconvincing green screen effects. This week’s Egusi production is a knock-off Game of Thrones adventure entitled “Medieval Kingdom of Kingdoms”, and stars “Babatunde Warrington as Icy John”, “Abiola de la Fufu as Kalypso”, “Folarin Soyinka Oyenusi James as tiny Worm” and , er some sort of wolfman thing.

  • The Poles: an intimate portrait of Poland and its people
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    The Independent

    The Poles: an intimate portrait of Poland and its people

    Richard Morgan is an award-winning British street and social documentary photographer. After receiving a PhD from University College London School of Slavonic and East European Studies, and prompted by the Brexit vote in June 2016, Morgan moved to the “heart of Europe”. Shot predominantly on black-and-white film, Morgan’s photographs are characterised by their humour and sadness, by their split-second contradictions and ambivalence.

  • Ancient Egyptian papyrus one of the first records of a man called out for sexual assault
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    The Independent

    Ancient Egyptian papyrus one of the first records of a man called out for sexual assault

    A 3,000-year-old Egyptian text is being reassessed as one of the first records of a powerful man being accused pf sexual assault. The script, known as Papyrus Salt 124, outlines a list of alleged indiscretions by an important artisan called Paneb, who lived in Thebes in about 1200BC. Paneb was the chief foreman in a community of artisans who built royal tombs in the ancient city.

  • 'Scene' review: A refreshingly honest and emotional look at the lives of two queer women in an interracial relationship
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    The Independent

    'Scene' review: A refreshingly honest and emotional look at the lives of two queer women in an interracial relationship

    Scene is a play that doesn’t beat around the bush. It’s an honest and emotional look at the lives of two queer women, Ayo and Flo, in an interracial relationship, and all the difficulties that throws up in a society where black people still experience racism. Scene was written by Lola Olufemi and Martha Krish, and the authenticity of writers who have experience of their characters’ struggles comes across on stage.

  • Quiz, Noel Coward Theatre, London, review: In James Graham's Who Wants to Be a Millionaire play, the audience is the jury of the 'coughing major'
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    The Independent

    Quiz, Noel Coward Theatre, London, review: In James Graham's Who Wants to Be a Millionaire play, the audience is the jury of the 'coughing major'

    With this transfer from Chichester, James Graham has pulled off off a remarkable hat-trick. Now, almost before we've had time to draw breath, he's back at the Noel Coward Theatre, creating a terrific buzz with this exuberantly entertaining and thought-provoking piece. In Ink, he explored this by charting Rupert Murdoch's transformation of the Sun into a best-selling tabloid.

  • No time for it: Tracey Emin's artwork for St Pancras station is lame and unlovely
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    The Independent

    No time for it: Tracey Emin's artwork for St Pancras station is lame and unlovely

    Tracey’s back. This morning she’s posing for a gaggle of snap-happy photographers, all kneeling in obeisance, inside Barlow’s great Victorian train shed at St Pancras International station. She prinks at her piled up auburn hair. She stands up on a little bar to increase her height somewhat. She sets her face in that snarly, wonky, slightly combative look of hers. Two more minutes, she calls. One more minute! Thirty seconds!

  • Pericles, Barbican, London, review: Shakespeare as modern psychodrama
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    The Independent

    Pericles, Barbican, London, review: Shakespeare as modern psychodrama

    Pericles is the most geographically restless of Shakespeare's late plays. The hero goes on a lengthy journey round the eastern Mediterranean before his family – sundered by a storm at sea and by the perfidy of guardians – is hauntingly reunited in the last act. The text is contentious and collaborative (with George Wilkins) and Shakespeare's voice is not heard in any sustained fashion until the third act.

  • TV Review, Come Home (BBC1): An inevitably mundane climax to a gut-wrenching story
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    The Independent

    TV Review, Come Home (BBC1): An inevitably mundane climax to a gut-wrenching story

    To recap, this three-part series concerned itself with a family being torn apart, and the inevitable traumas inflicted on all concerned – mum (Paula Malcolmson), abandoned dad (Christopher Eccleston) and the kids – and even on some people not particularly concerned.

  • Queen makes joke about Donald Trump to Sir David Attenborough
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    The Independent

    Queen makes joke about Donald Trump to Sir David Attenborough

    Constitutional convention dictates the Queen remains neutral at all times and that others must keep their conversations with her confidential. The longest reigning monarch in history, “Elizabeth the silent” has never given a press interview and does not vote in the general election. All of the above means Sir David Attenborough is likely to have been shocked to hear her joke a loud helicopter flying above them sounded like US president Donald Trump.

  • Brexit in photos: How life on the Irish border is set to change, 20 years on from the Good Friday agreement
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    The Independent

    Brexit in photos: How life on the Irish border is set to change, 20 years on from the Good Friday agreement

    Gordon Crockett does not wish to suffer the same fate as his great-great grandfather, who began farming near the northernmost tip of Ireland before a border was ever erected on the island. The Crockett family farm was cut in two when Ireland gained independence from Britain in 1921 and the island was partitioned. “Before partition he used to milk cows but as soon as the partition came the custom men were standing across the field and told him, ‘That’s the last time you bring cows across the border’,” said Gordon, the fifth generation of farmer in the family.

  • Jimmy Kimmel apologises for making jokes about Melania Trump and Sean Hannity
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    The Independent

    Jimmy Kimmel apologises for making jokes about Melania Trump and Sean Hannity

    Jimmy Kimmel has been forced to apologise after he mocked Melania Trump’s accent and made a joke about Fox News host Sean Hannity which was deemed insensitive to the LGBT+ community. The talk show host made the remarks in a fierce Twitter spat with Hannity, which saw the pair spend the last week trading insults. The row was sparked by Hannity taking offence to Kimmel’s decision to poke fun at the first lady’s Slovenian accent during a segment on Jimmy Kimmel Live!.

  • Geoffrey Rush 'virtually housebound and barely eating', claim actor's lawyers
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    The Independent

    Geoffrey Rush 'virtually housebound and barely eating', claim actor's lawyers

    Geoffrey Rush is virtually housebound and scarcely eats after a Sydney newspaper claimed he took part in inappropriate behaviour at a theatre, according to the actor’s lawyer. The Oscar-winning actor is suing Sydney’s Daily Telegraph and the journalist Jonathon Moran for defamation over articles alleging he behaved inappropriately to a colleague during a Sydney Theatre Company production of King Lear in 2015. The Australian stage and screen veteran has endured “tremendous emotional and social hardship” since the paper’s coverage in 2017, according to an affidavit by Rush’s solicitor which was filed in the federal court in Sydney on Monday.

  • National Youth Dance Company, Sadler's Wells, London, review: verve and polish
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    The Independent

    National Youth Dance Company, Sadler's Wells, London, review: verve and polish

    Aged from 16 to 23, and trained in different styles, these 41 dancers come together to create a unified company. In Sharon Eyal’s Used To Be Blonde, they move with a mix of catwalk chic and shared intensity. Started in 2013, NYDC finds 30 new dancers each year for a programme of workshops and residencies.