• From Ananya To Sharmin, Let's Find Out Whose Off-Duty Avatar Was The Most Impressive?
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    Boldsky

    From Ananya To Sharmin, Let's Find Out Whose Off-Duty Avatar Was The Most Impressive?

    About last evening, Bollywood's leading divas were spotted in the city. They looked humble in their casual ensembles and wowed us totally with their style statements. While some kept it very simple, the others gave us some fresh outfit goals.

  • Ministers reject plans for 1p per garment levy to tackle fast fashion
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    The Guardian

    Ministers reject plans for 1p per garment levy to tackle fast fashion

    UK shoppers buy twice as many clothes as consumers in Italy or Germany, and 300,000 tonnes are disposed of every year. Photograph: Catherine Servel/Getty Images Ministers have rejected recommendations from MPs to clean up the huge environmental impact of fast fashion, which sees 300,000 tonnes of clothing burned or buried in the UK every year. MPs on the Environmental Audit Committee (EAC) said a charge of 1p for each garment was urgently needed to raise £35m a year for better clothing collection and sorting, a move supported by many in the industry. But the government’s response, published on Tuesday, failed to commit to this, stating only that it could be considered by 2025. The MPs report, Fixing Fashion, was published in February and revealed that UK shoppers buy more new clothes than any other European country, and roughly twice as many as in Germany and Italy. It also said textile production contributes more emissions to the climate crisis than international aviation and shipping combined, consumes lake-sized volumes of fresh water and creates chemical and microplastic pollution. The cross-party EAC said there should be a ban on incinerating or landfilling unsold clothes that can be reused or recycled. But the government said: “We believe that positive approaches are required to find outlets for waste textiles rather than simply imposing a landfill ban.” The MPs also recommended mandatory environmental targets for fashion retailers with a turnover above £36m. However, the government said it would only “encourage the wider industry to take part in [the voluntary] Sustainable Clothing Action Plan (Scap)”. Just 11 fashion retailers have signed up to Scap and the recycling charity that runs it, Wrap, has lost 80% of its government funding since 2010. The EAC also presented evidence from Wrap that the impact of the increasing sales of clothing each year outweighs the efficiency savings being made in carbon emissions and water use. “Fashion producers should be forced to clear up the mountains of waste they create,” said EAC chair Mary Creagh. “The government has rejected our call, demonstrating that it is content to tolerate practices that trash the environment, having just committed to net zero emission targets. Urgent action must be taken to change the fast-fashion business model which produces cheap clothes that cost the earth.” The government said in response: “We recognise how crucial it is for the environmental and social impacts to be well managed, particularly in this era of fast fashion … In our response we explain the action already being taken in respect of clothing and outline our [existing] plans for the future.” But none of the EAC recommendations were accepted. These include a reduced rate of VAT on clothes repair services, as implemented in Sweden, and that fashion companies whose products have lower environmental impacts should be rewarded by government schemes and those that do not should be penalised. A recent survey for the fashion trade publication Drapers reported that 85% of 370 brands, retailers and suppliers thought the government was not doing enough to help the fashion industry become more sustainable, with 69% supporting the 1p a garment charge. Most (60%) said the main barrier to becoming more sustainable is that it drives up costs, with 36% saying shoppers are unwilling to pay for sustainable fashion.

  • 24 '70s Fashion Trends Making a Major Comeback
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    Cosmopolitan

    24 '70s Fashion Trends Making a Major Comeback

    Groovy, baby. From Cosmopolitan

  • Fendi celebrates Italian summers with help of Luca Guadagnino
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    The Guardian

    Fendi celebrates Italian summers with help of Luca Guadagnino

    Call Me By Your Name director made garden sketches for concept presented by maison. Two Italian greats came together on Monday morning in Milan as the fashion house Fendi unveiled the Oscar-winning director Luca Guadagnino as the guest artist for its spring/summer 2010 men’s collection. Seating guests on wicker chairs in the garden of Fendi’s headquarters, which lined the meandering gravelled catwalk, Fendi effectively invited the audience on to one of Guadagnino’s sets for the show. It evoked the spellbinding summers he depicted in 2009’s I Am Love and 2017’s box-office hit Call Me By Your Name – both set in and not too far from Milan, and which are on the unofficial fashion curriculum. A heatwave and the music – which featured excerpts of piano by the Japanese composer Ryuichi Sakamoto, who worked on the soundtrack of Call Me By Your Name – only helped. Guadagnino has reinterpreted the concept of La Dolce Vita for a 21st-century audience through his achingly beautiful films. He is the undisputed modern master of painting Italy in its most beguiling light. A long-term friend of Fendi’s creative director, Silvia Venturini Fendi, his collaboration with the fashion house brought with it the ardent desire cinemagoers are usually left with after watching one of his films. Bucking the brand’s habit of showing in a dark inside venue, Fendi was keen that the collection was presented “ en plein air [outdoors] … drawing upon the idea of the garden as a symbol of man’s most sophisticated relationship with nature”, read the show notes. Such sophistication was enhanced by the painterly floral prints that splayed out on to relaxed tailoring and shirts in silk and organza, layered as if to resemble the distant blur of sun-dappled blooms in a Lombardy garden. These originated from sketches Guadagnino made during “moments of ideleness” on the set of his latest film, Suspiria, on which Fendi served as associate producer. So too, in the super-fine knitwear that came waffled and in open weave – a lattice effect akin to a garden trellis. Fabrics, such as hessian and raffia, contributed to the back-to-nature ambience. Statements came via twill boilersuits, wax jackets – long and short with plenty of practical pockets for tools – and excellent true-blue denim, while accessories worked with the horticultural theme. Gardening gloves with the house’s logo printed on the ribbed cuffs just needed a pair of secateurs to be complete; bucket hats came with sun shields. Elsewhere, plaid picnic baskets and a leather-bound watering can enhanced the setting. Fendi is a house for whom much-hyped product has been commercially successful in recent years and a foray into more elegant territory has not left fans of this aesthetic wanting. The setting and aesthetic heralded something of a new era for the house – a sentiment particularly poignant given that this was the first menswear show since the death of its long-term creative director Karl Lagerfeld, who died in February. While most famous for his tenure at Chanel, Lagerfeld helmed the Milan-based house for 54 years. Guadagnino has close ties with the fashion industry, frequently working with high-profile designers. For A Bigger Splash, made in 2015, the former Dior and Calvin Klein designer Raf Simons created the wardrobe worn by Tilda Swinton’s character, while this year Guadagnino worked with Giorgio Armani to create a foundation to support budding filmmakers. Armani bookended the day with his show on Monday evening, bringing Milan fashion week to a close. Like the overriding themes of Guadignino’s films, he also focused on summer as a “liberating season”. This translated to a relaxed take on everything on the catwalk where “clothes blend together with spontaneity and elegance” – as the designer relayed. It prevailed in a collection that blended formal and athleisure attire. Where there was a waistcoat or a suit, it was relaxed in structure, cut from cotton chambray and worn with a nonchalantly tied cravat, rather than a tie, and tailored tracksuit bottoms. Where there were knits, they were fisherman-knit cardigans; jackets were denim bomber silhouettes; and shirting was silk, but the silhouette was dipped and untucked. Footwear featured espadrilles, trainers and smoking slippers. This is, of course, the designer’s signature when it comes to his eponymous label. His commitment to this nonchalant luxury is one of the main reasons why his brand has kept a loyal – and profitable – clientele over the years and, at the same time, makes his brand one of the few major fashion houses to remain entirely independent. Like Fendi, Armani broke with show space convention, choosing to stage this outing in the courtyard of the brand’s HQ. As the models took their final bow, Armani joined them, organising them in synchronisation around the pebbled courtyard adorned with greenery and flowers so photographers could get their very best angle. And, just as during the Fendi show earlier in the day, it was like watching one of Italy’s finest directors at play.

  • Gloria Vanderbilt: farewell fashion's innovative heiress
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    The Guardian

    Gloria Vanderbilt: farewell fashion's innovative heiress

    Jeans that ‘really hug your derrière’ … Gloria Vanderbilt sitting amidst a group of models in her designer jeans. Photograph: Evelyn Floret/The LIFE Images Collection via Getty Images Gloria Vanderbilt first ventured into the fashion world as a model. She was photographed by top names including Richard Avedon and Horst P Horst and appeared in Vogue as well as Harper’s Bazaar. It wasn’t until the 1970s, when Vanderbilt was in her 50s, that she established her design credentials, becoming an early pioneer of stretch jeans. Vanderbilt worked with manufacturer Mohan Murjani to popularise jeans for women at a time when they were largely designed for men. She was among the first to use a famous family name in the marketing of a fashion line, emblazoning her signature across the back pocket of the famously fitted designs. The Amanda jeans which – as she put it – “really hug your derrière” cemented her place in fashion history, and proved innovative enough to spark a $100m (£79m) empire. “The marketing of Gloria Vanderbilt jeans is one of the most dramatic American business success stories of the decade,” reported the New York Times in 1979. Yet her style legacy goes beyond the clothes she designed: as an heiress and socialite, Vanderbilt regularly featured in best-dressed lists. She expanded her product line to include other logoed items, as well as perfumes, sheets, shoes and accessories. Meanwhile, her friend Truman Capote is said to have based the character of Holly Golightly from Breakfast at Tiffany’s on her. The novella was famously made into a film starring another fashion icon, Audrey Hepburn. Vanderbilt was admired by others within the industry, with fellow designer Roy Halston Frowick, AKA Halston, remarking that she had “become a professional in the most difficult, cutthroat business there is, and I say, ‘good show’.” Designer Diane von Fürstenberg, best known for popularising the wrap dress, also noted that Vanderbilt “tried to do many, many things for many, many years. The thing that you least associated her with – jeans – worked.” Gloria Vanderbilt, Vogue 1968. Photograph: Gianni Penati/Getty Like Lee Radziwill, who also died earlier this year, Vanderbilt might also be described as “the original influencer”, often appearing in person to promote the products bearing her name. From 1978 to 1984, she was reported to have earned more than $17m. However, by the time the Gloria Vanderbilt Apparel Corporation was sold to the Jones Apparel Group in 2002 for $100m, she had withdrawn all interest in the company. “I’m not knocking inherited money,” she told the New York Times in 1985, “but the money I’ve made has a reality to me that inherited money doesn’t have.” In a world where the denim industry has become king and worth an estimated £71bn, Vanderbilt’s passing will rightfully reflect on – and celebrate – the legacy she leaves behind.

  • Priyanka Chopra Jonas Proves She Is The Queen Of Street-style Looks With This Outfit
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    Boldsky

    Priyanka Chopra Jonas Proves She Is The Queen Of Street-style Looks With This Outfit

    Well, you leave it to Priyanka Chopra Jonas to teach you how to slay the street-style fashion. She is quite simply the queen of street-style looks and her casual fashion game only gets stronger with time. The latest ensemble of

  • Aditi Rao Hydari Or Nushrat Bharucha: Whose Casual Avatar Did You Like More?
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    Boldsky

    Aditi Rao Hydari Or Nushrat Bharucha: Whose Casual Avatar Did You Like More?

    Aditi Rao Hydari and Nushrat Bharucha looked gorgeous and totally slayed it in style recently. They were spotted in casual outfits and they gave us mid-week fashion goals. Their outfits seemed perfect for cafe outing with BFFs. Let's decode their

  • Donatella Versace pays homage to the Prodigy's Keith Flint in Milan
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    The Guardian

    Donatella Versace pays homage to the Prodigy's Keith Flint in Milan

    The designer’s SS20 collection once again proved her talent for making a splash; elsewhere, Dolce & Gabbana put the leopard into leopard print. From one 90s superstar to another … Donatella Versace dedicated her spring/summer 2020 menswear show to the Progidy’s Keith Flint in Milan at the weekend. The designer described the musician, who died in March this year, as “my friend, and a disruptor of this world”. Homage was paid through the pounding soundtrack of the band’s monster hit, Firestarter, and models bearing his distinctive double mohawk and tinted bug-eye sunglasses. Although the revelation that Flint and Versace were friends may have come as a surprise, it’s not an incongruous pairing; Versace has been something of a disruptor herself. Picking up the mantle of the family business her brother, Gianni, established in 1978, she embraced full-blown sex appeal in her collections from day one, and has admitted in the past to not knowing how to do things quietly. Last year, she surprised the world when she announced that she sold her family company to Capri Holdings – formerly known as Michael Kors Holdings. Less than a year into the merger, it is a bit early to say how that is going from a business perspective. On the catwalk, however, it is very much business as usual. Versace described her next-season muse as “a slightly more serious guy” just before the show, adding that she wanted to celebrate the moment “a young man becomes a man” which for her comes the ceremonial purchase of their first car. Models walked around an XL black car covered in purple flowers, wearing suits, shirts and double denim emblazoned and appliqued with car prints – a continuation from last season’s collaboration with Ford. Continuing a theme from the womenswear show in February, looks featured vintage fragrance advertisements from the brand’s archive. We were told, post-show, that this was a nod to rediscovery; another tribute to the brand’s past without being too obvious. Other themes in this collection didn’t play the same game. The bondage look, which has been synonymous with the house since Gianni’s 1990s collections, appeared via black leather trousers with all-over eyelets and whipstitched seams. The memory of Donatella’s brother was, as ever, evident throughout, with his signature appearing on ties, socks and in all-over Swarovski applique in skintight jersey. Moving the handwriting of the house forward, she adapted its signature baroque print – usually seen in black and gold – into acidic pastels. Tailoring, meanwhile, was softened with a less rigid fit on blazers and bootleg jersey trousers – like the ones Versace favours herself. Versace “doesn’t like to talk about gender fluidity, more interested in the fluidity of masculinity”, said the company, post preview. The CEO of Capri Holdings, John D Idol, has made clear his plans for the brand’s evolution: there are plans to increase the number of Versace shops from 200 to 300. He added that “with the full resources of our group, we believe that Versace will grow to [sales of] over $2bn”. For her part, Versace is showing she intends to keep up her creative side of such expansion. Earlier in the day, Dolce & Gabbana revealed the latest collection in its brand story. Titled Sicilian Tropical, it featured designers Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana paying homage to their southern Italian roots with fruit-bowl and piastrelle prints. For the rest of the collection, they went further afield. The set was transformed into an elaborate jungle rainforest which featured a lifesize leopard and jaguar on the stage (not real, but made from sisal by the artist Anne Andersson, and borrowed from the designers’ private collection) and which led on to a 40-yard leopard-print catwalk. On it, the collection was an amalgamation of several themes: baroque, pin-ups, polka dot and the 1950s, we were informed. Retro sports jerseys – including baseball, tennis, golf, rugby and boxing – were reimagined in lace “to make it more sexy”, said Gabbana backstage before the show, and emblazoned with messages such as, “Choose me”, “Take a look” and “Only good vibes”. Elsewhere, khaki dominated the 119-look show, appearing in uniform-fresh, box pleated separates. The duo’s adopted decade was a dominating theme throughout, but, while it may be an era be a decade ripe for mining classic sartorial codes, some – such as the wide-lapelled double-breasted suits, knitted polos, Cuban-collared shirts and pleated trousers seen here – are naturally less problematic than others in our woke world. Such expeditions, like those evoked by the khaki section of this show, in the faraway jungle setting conjured voyager vibes which, these days, tend to get talked about in a colonial context rather than recalled in such a way on the runway. Of the setting and direction, Gabbana said before the show: “Fashion is beautiful because you change every season.” Different, but familiar, this was a collection that was distinctively Dolce & Gabbana.

  • Shikha Talsania Gave Us Major Jewellery Goal With Her Latest Look
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    Boldsky

    Shikha Talsania Gave Us Major Jewellery Goal With Her Latest Look

    Shikha Talsania, for sure, gave us jewellery lessons with her latest look. The 'Veere Di Wedding' actress attended the screening of 'Kaafir' recently and looked absolutely awesome. The actress wore a simple dress and notched up her look with impeccable

  • Dia Mirza’s Blue Floral Dress Makes For A Perfect All-Occasion Attire
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    Boldsky

    Dia Mirza’s Blue Floral Dress Makes For A Perfect All-Occasion Attire

    Want some dress goals? Take inspiration from the gorgeous Dia Mirza, who sported a blue floral dress for the screening of her upcoming web series, 'Kaafir'. Dia looked gorgeous as always and exuded soothing vibes. Her styling was done to

  • Priyanka Chopra Jonas Shows Us How To Slay It In A Monochrome Dress
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    Boldsky

    Priyanka Chopra Jonas Shows Us How To Slay It In A Monochrome Dress

    After her satiny ivory shirt dress, Priyanka Chopra Jonas stepped up her fashion game with this monochromatic dress. She wore this dress for the Bumble event and Priyanka looked gorgeous as ever. It was a classy dress but it had

  • Givenchy men's show brings Asian street style to Italian villa
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    The Guardian

    Givenchy men's show brings Asian street style to Italian villa

    The floral patterns of the collection’s tapestry coats were inspired by poet Charles Baudelaire. Photograph: Pietro D’Aprano/Getty Images Just over a year since she became one of the most famous designers in the world by designing Meghan Markle’s wedding dress, the Givenchy creative director, Clare Waight Keller, showed her relationship with the British royals was not a fleeting one. In Florence on Wednesday evening, the designer staged her first full menswear show for the French house in the grounds of Villa Palmieri, a 14th-century patrician villa that Queen Victoria visited three times during her reign. Waight Keller said she was drawn to the cypress tree-lined estate for its crumbling beauty, likening the setting to the dark poetry of Charles Baudelaire, who was an inspiration for the collection. Two types of nylon were worked into anoraks, parkas and suits. Photograph: Pietro D’Aprano/Getty Images Conversely, so too was 21st-century Asian street style, which Waight Keller has been researching and admitted to finding “utterly fascinating. There’s a sense of freedom in how they dress and explore fashion almost in the way us Brits did in the 80s.” As a result, the collection was a clash of titanic reference points, mixing “the very historical with the hyper modern”. In characteristically inventive style, Waight Keller sought equilibrium between her inspiration points through fabrics. Her studies of the typography of Baudelaire’s poetry led her to discover that one of the relatives of the fashion house’s founder, Hubert de Givenchy, manufactured tapestries in the same era as the Parisian poet. At the same time, her preoccupation with Asia’s youthquake led her into highly technical terrain. The result was the development of two types of nylon, which look like velvet and liquid mercury respectively, that were worked into anoraks, parkas and suits. She also created new weaves used for the tailored tapestry coats, with a floral pattern inspired by Baudelaire’s volumes Les Fleurs du Mal and Le Spleen de Paris. She presented her futuristic vision on models who were street-cast and who exclusively wore trainers. “There are no formal shoes at all, everything is a sports shoe and different permutations of,” the designer said. The shoes in question featured two styles from the brand’s collaboration with the Japanese trainer brand Onitsuka Tiger, which is immediately available to purchase. Waight Keller has been wearing the brand for years and sported a pair as she took her post-show bow. All the models wore trainers or some permutation of a sports shoe. Photograph: Pietro D’Aprano/Getty Images The expansion into brand collaborations is matched by Givenchy’s imminent amplification of its bag business. This month, the brand’s chief executive, Philippe Fortunato, revealed it was “making huge investments in developing our savoir-faire both in leather goods and accessories in Italy”, and naturally the bags were a focus here. Logo-bearing crossbody, rucksack, carryall and mini-trunk styles completed many of the looks, while a small leather wrist pouch and lanyard neck pouch both have the potential to claim the bumbag’s crown some next summer. Givenchy is investing in its range of bags and leather goods. Photograph: WWD/Rex/Shutterstock Although this was a menswear show, Waight Keller was keen to point out that the menswear and womenswear collections exist in symbiosis and there were several unisex outfits as a result. Unusually for a luxury fashion house, Givenchy is split down the middle with menswear and womenswear. Earlier this year, Fortunato praised Waight Keller for bringing cohesion between the two. Parent company LVMH is in the midst of a major menswear invigoration. In the last year, its appointment of Kim Jones at Dior Men and Virgil Abloh at Louis Vuitton have been credited with having a positive effect on its annual profits. As for Waight Keller, her expansion across the categories is only growing in confidence. “[There is] quite a lot of what I’ve worked on which comes from my womenswear roots … [but] I’ve been very specific about how I want to give the attitude of the boy and the man. ‘You’ll feel a British vibe no doubt.’ Clare Waight Keller acknowledges the audience. Photograph: Pietro D’Aprano/Getty Images She is also clear of her own roots and authenticity in her designs. “I wanted to bring my point of view definitely – you’ll feel a British vibe no doubt, that’s part of who I am and what I love,” she added.

  • Kiara Advani Ups Her Separates Game With This Ivory Outfit And A Costume Neckpiece
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    Boldsky

    Kiara Advani Ups Her Separates Game With This Ivory Outfit And A Costume Neckpiece

    After her maroon animal-printed outfit, Kiara Advani stepped up her fashion game with this white ensemble, which she wore for the latest promotional round of 'Kabir Singh'. In terms of fashion, Kiara has been giving us hits and misses. She

  • Sanjay Leela Bhansali's Niece, Sharmin Segal Woos In Pastel Ethnic Outfits
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    Boldsky

    Sanjay Leela Bhansali's Niece, Sharmin Segal Woos In Pastel Ethnic Outfits

    Sanjay Leela Bhansali's niece, Sharmin Segal is all set to make her film debut with her uncle's movie, 'Malaal'. The budding actress is quite a fashionista and she has particularly wooed us with her traditional outfits. Styled by Ami Patel,

  • Taapsee Pannu Inspires Us To Level Up Our Fashion Game With Her Eclectic On-duty Outfits
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    Boldsky

    Taapsee Pannu Inspires Us To Level Up Our Fashion Game With Her Eclectic On-duty Outfits

    Taapsee Pannu is all wrapped-up in the promotions of 'Game Over' and she has been giving us eclectic dress goals. Her promotional wardrobe is full of fun and gorgeous ensembles. Taapsee has been particularly making strong case for denims and

  • Tamannaah's Stripes Or Kiara's Animal Prints: Whose Printed Attire Is More Impressive?
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    Boldsky

    Tamannaah's Stripes Or Kiara's Animal Prints: Whose Printed Attire Is More Impressive?

    Tamannaah Bhatia and Kiara Advani surprised us with their printed jumpsuits. Both were dressed for movie promotions but one clearly wowed us and the other didn't. So, let's find out what jumpsuits they wore, which caught our attention. Also, let's

  • Red & White, Priyanka & Zaira's Dresses Can Spice Up Your Party Night
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    Boldsky

    Red & White, Priyanka & Zaira's Dresses Can Spice Up Your Party Night

    About last night, Priyanka Chopra Jonas and Zaira Wasim attended the wrap-up party of their upcoming film, 'The Sky Is Pink'. Priyanka and Zaira looked classy in their party numbers and gave us fresh dress goals. While one went for

  • Why lilos are moving from the pool to our wardrobes
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    The Guardian

    Why lilos are moving from the pool to our wardrobes

    This stuff is ballooning ... a model in a outfit by University of Westminster student San Kim. Photograph: Stuart Wilson/BFC/Getty Images It seems to me that 2019’s inflatable culture is a classic millennial story: twenty- and thirtysomethings harking back to their youths, a time when Miss Selfridge was filled with inflatable backpacks and every student house had a blow-up armchair in baby blue or pink. Back in the olden days, the only things available to inflate were lilos, or the odd airbed. Now, shops are full of inflatable things – unicorns and sharks and llamas – all waiting to bob around a pool somewhere. On Instagram, young celebrities always seem to be lounging in blue water in blow-up flamingos or avocados or pizza slices. We are living in an age of literal hot air. Inevitably, inflatables have made it to the catwalk. Like any great fashion trend, it has subtler iterations (indeed, this is how you know it’s a trend, rather than a subversive statement or a nervous breakdown). At the University of Westminster’s MA Menswear show this week, one student, San Kim, put a gentleman model in a see-through inflatable paired with white underpants. Footage of recent St Martin’s graduate Fredrik Tjærandsen’s balloon dress went viral after his graduate fashion show at the end of last month. It is a hyper-engineered piece that turns into a regular dress, sinking over the wearer, when deflated. A vivid and no doubt necessary seam makes it look like arse cheeks from some angles, but I wouldn’t say that was the most impractical thing about it. There are phallic elements to some of this – Tjærandsen’s dresses, as they deflate, look a bit like condoms. In fact, everything looks a bit like a condom. But I don’t think that’s the core cultural take-home here. That playful “Ooh, a sausage, looks a bit like a nob” schtick only works in contexts where you don’t expect it, and everyone expects frisson from the catwalk. Perhaps what is says is that we are at the theoretical endpoint of clothes. The dominant trend in any given season, which fashion people never mention because it is not cool, is: what does this make your body look like? Does it accentuate or minimise? Is it “masculine” (big shoulders) or “feminine” (small waists)? Are we throwing in a “regular” model to make a point? (The world is still unclear about what that point is, by the way; it’s definitely more complicated than “regular-shaped people are human, too”.) In a balloon dress, you have no shape. Even when it deflates, it is all bumps, so you go from looking like a melon to a blackberry, neither of which is a classic human form. You have broken free from your corporeal self, in other words; you can neither be judged nor run for a bus; you meet no physical standards nor invite desire. Wearing an inflatable is not a constraint but a liberation. There. Now we all want one, right?

  • The sky's the limit: A-Cold-Wall confirms its ascent with new collection
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    The Guardian

    The sky's the limit: A-Cold-Wall confirms its ascent with new collection

    A model on the A-Cold-Wall catwalk at London Fashion Week Mens, June 10, 2019. Photograph: Henry Nicholls/Reuters Fashion label A-Cold-Wall - set up five years ago - was the highlight of the last day of the London fashion week men’s shows in London. While not yet a household name, consider that a matter of time. Hours after designer Samuel Ross unveiled his spring/summer 2020 collection, he scooped the British Fashion Council and GQ menswear prize, showing the faith that the British fashion industry have in him to take operations global. This is a brand that has grown impressively on social media – with nearly 600k dedicated followers on Instagram. Ross paid this audience back on a rainy Monday afternoon: for his fourth show, around 100 young people dressed in hoodies, bucket hats and trainers joined the fashion crowd and celebrities including Arsenal player Héctor Bellerín, film director Steve McQueen and rapper A$AP Ferg. Héctor Bellerín at the A-Cold-Wall show at London Fashion Week Mens. Photograph: Jeff Spicer/BFC/Getty Images for BFC A$AP Ferg at the A-Cold-Wall show at London Fashion Week Mens. Photograph: Jeff Spicer/BFC/Getty Images for BFC Watching the show from a balcony at an industrial printworks in south-east London, many members of the public filmed the event on smart phones in order to post video to their social media accounts. Arguably, in the modern era, this peer-to-peer coverage is priceless. It has helped A-Cold-Wall go from five stockists in 2014 to 165 in 2019, and gain a place in the hypebeast scene alongside Supreme, Palace and Off-White, the label founded by Ross’s mentor Virgil Abloh. Ross is also gaining fans within the industry now – winning Emerging Menswear Talent at the British Fashion Awards last year. Last month, he joined the Copenhagen fashion summit to discuss sustainability with Nike’s chief design officer, John Hoke. The collection continued the themes that Ross has established. He takes silhouettes associated with streetwear – hooded jackets, parkas, combat trousers – and reduces them down to minimal elements, with an architectural feel. A hooded top had armour-like oversleeves, while a jacket with multiple pockets looked like a fashion take on survivalist gear. Some pieces showed a move towards tailoring, with some suits and a trench shape throughout. Canvas boots, a collaboration with Converse, will no doubt sell out before they even hit those 165 stores. While the designs are pretty wearable, Ross adds a sense of drama through pounding music and styling. Most models had clay coating part of their skin, and some had lead stuck to their faces. According to the show notes, this element was about “exploring our storied relationship between material and emotion”. After the show, Ross – a serene presence dressed in a white shirt and matching trousers, with bare feet, despite the concrete floor – continued with the high-brow pronouncements. “I wanted to imbue the heaviness of lead into garment form,” he said. “My father is a stained-glass artist, one of the only black stained-glass artists in the country. I grew up with him moulding and working with lead.” He then asked: “How do we expand on the relationship to object and how object permeates and influences how we operate in social space?” Samuel Ross (second left) displays his BFC/GQ designer menswear prize … with GQ editor Dylan Jones, Caroline Rush, CEO of the British Fashion Council and Kevin Jiang. vice president of JD.com. Photograph: Stuart Wilson/BFC/Getty Images His thoughts on bringing A-Cold-Wall fans into the show were less academic. As a black, working-class designer, Ross is still unusual in fashion. He wants to open doors to others. “The main reason I wanted to invite the public in was so there wasn’t this conservative division which is often in fashion,” he says. “It doesn’t feel very liberal to me.” Ross first studied graphic design and product design before setting up his brand. “I entered fashion from a slightly different angle and I want to make sure that my position is used to incubate that [for others].” He is taking this inclusivity seriously, donating his bursary from the Newgen initiative to a younger designer, 20-year-old Eastwood Danso, who showed at London Fashion Week Mens on Saturday. “I’m speaking boldly here but I wish this to be a trend,” said Ross. “We should feed back in to the industry.”

  • Masaba And Janhvi Kapoor Made A Strong Case For White Dresses
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    Boldsky

    Masaba And Janhvi Kapoor Made A Strong Case For White Dresses

    Masaba Gupta and Janhvi Kapoor recently attended the birthday party of Sonam Kapoor Ahuja and they both wore white dresses. While one made a strong case for a long white dress, the other had the mercury rising in a little

  • Deepika Padukone Wooed Us With A Quirky And Androgynous Neon Green Outfit
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    Boldsky

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