• Reality TV ‘encourages children to drink and smoke’, study suggests
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    The Independent

    Reality TV ‘encourages children to drink and smoke’, study suggests

    Reality TV shows such as Love Island are encouraging young people to smoke or drink underage by bombarding them with images of alcohol and tobacco more than other prime-time programmes, a new study finds.The study, conducted by researchers from University of Nottingham’s Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies, measured depictions of alcohol and tobacco products on several reality programmes that aired on UK channels for 112 episodes between January and August 2018.The programmes analysed also included Made in Chelsea, The Only Way is Essex, Geordie Shore and the now discontinued Celebrity Big Brother.In total, the researchers estimated that 4.9 billion images of alcohol were shown to the UK population in the episodes, including 580 million to children under the age of 16.Meanwhile, 214 million overall tobacco impressions were shown to the public, including 47 million to children under 16.Researchers analysed the number of one-minute clips containing tobacco and/or alcohol imagery in the episodes, including actual use, implied use, tobacco or alcohol-related materials, product-specific branding and estimated viewer exposure to the imagery on screen. This data was then combined with audience viewing figures with mid-year population figures for 2017.The research’s findings, which are published in the Journal of Public Health, showed that alcohol content appeared in all 112 episodes and in 2,212 one-minute clips, which is the equivalent of 42 per cent of all the footage studied.Meanwhile, alcohol consumption was apparent in 18 per cent of footage and 34 per cent featured inferred consumption, predominantly by characters holding alcoholic beverages.Love Island included the greatest number of clips showing alcohol, while alcohol branding featured in 69 per cent of Geordie Shore episodes.Tobacco content appeared in 20 of the 112 episodes, with the majority (98 per cent) – including actual tobacco use, inferred tobacco use, and tobacco paraphernalia – featuring in Celebrity Big Brother.“Given that seeing alcohol or tobacco imagery in the media promotes use among young people, our study therefore identifies reality television shows as a major potential driver of alcohol and tobacco consumption in young people in the UK,” says Alexander Barker, lead researcher on the study from the University of Nottingham’s Division of Epidemiology and Public Health.“Tighter scheduling rules, such as restricting the amount of content and branding shown in these programmes, could prevent children and adolescents from being exposed to the tobacco and alcohol content.”The researchers previously reported high levels of tobacco imagery, including branding, in the third series of Love Island in 2017.However, after complaints over the level of smoking in the series to Ofcom, ITV decided to remove all smoking content featured in the show, resulting in the new study finding no content of that nature in last year’s series of the hit programme. At the time of receiving the complaints, an ITV spokesperson said: “The islanders are only shown smoking if this happens at the same time as they are having conversations we believe to be editorially important to the narrative of the show.”The spokesperson added that the contestants’ cigarettes were in plain white packs so that the show would not be seen to be promoting one brand.The Ofcom Code prohibits product placement of alcoholic drinks, cigarettes and other tobacco products. The organisation states that there must be “editorial justification” for a product to be placed in a programme.In light of the new study, a spokesperson from Love Island told The Independent: "Alcohol is always restricted and provided by production in moderation at our discretion."They added that while smoking is prohibited within the villa or the villa garden this year, producers have provided a designated smoking area outside of the villa where islanders will be able to have a cigarette if they choose to."Islanders will only be able to use the smoking area alone which will limit conversations," they added.

  • Depersonalization-Derealization Disorder: Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis And Treatment
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    Boldsky

    Depersonalization-Derealization Disorder: Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis And Treatment

    Depersonalization-derealization disorder is a feeling wherein one feels detached from one's thoughts, feelings and the surrounding environment . People having this condition do not lose contact with reality. Instead, they realize that their perceptions are odd or not real. This

  • The Earliest Signs of Alzheimer’s Everyone Over 50 Should Know
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    Best Life

    The Earliest Signs of Alzheimer’s Everyone Over 50 Should Know

    While some might seem like normal age-related issues at first, they go far beyond occasionally losing keys. These are the earliest signs of Alzheimer's.

  • Facebook posts ‘better at predicting some health conditions’ than demographic data, claim researchers
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    The Independent

    Facebook posts ‘better at predicting some health conditions’ than demographic data, claim researchers

    Facebook posts might be better at predicting some health conditions than traditional demographic information, a new study suggests.Researchers at Stony Brook University and The University of Pennsylvania Health System have found that the language people use on Facebook could help clinicians predict whether or not they suffer from illnesses such as depression and diabetes in a similar way to physical symptoms.The research team used an automated data collection technique to gather and analyse the entire Facebook post history of almost 1,000 patients, who had also linked their electronic medical records to their social media profiles.After acquiring and examining information on the language used in their posts and their demographics, such as age and sex, the researchers found they were able to identify 21 different conditions using data collected from participants’ Facebook posts alone. These included psychosis, anxiety and alcoholism.In 10 of the conditions identified, researchers concluded that Facebook data was a better predictor than demographic information.Some words had obvious links to the conditions. For example, the team found that those who used words such as “drink” and “bottle” in their posts were more likely to abuse alcohol.Less obviously, those who used religious language in their posts, e.g. words such as “God” and “pray”, were 15 times more likely to have diabetes compared to those who rarely used those words.Lead author Raina Merchant, director of Penn Medicine's Center for Digital Health, said: "This work is early, but our hope is that the insights gleaned from these posts could be used to better inform patients and providers about their health."As social media posts are often about someone's lifestyle choices and experiences or how they're feeling, this information could provide additional information about disease management and exacerbation."Senior author Andrew Schwartz, assistant professor of computer science at Stony Brook University, added that our “digital language” reflects a different aspect of our lives to traditional medical data and could provide medical professionals with key diagnostic insights."Many studies have now shown a link between language patterns and specific disease, such as language predictive of depression or language that gives insights into whether someone is living with cancer,” he added. “However, by looking across many medical conditions, we get a view of how conditions relate to each other, which can enable new applications of AI for medicine."In light of the findings, the research team suggests there may be potential for developing systems that allow patients to hand over their social media data to medical officials should they choose to so that they can provide clinicians with additional data that may improve how effectively their condition is treated. "For instance, if someone is trying to lose weight and needs help understanding their food choices and exercise regimens, having a healthcare provider review their social media record might give them more insight into their usual patterns in order to help improve them," Merchant explained.Merchant is conducting a trial later this year to test this theory.

  • 8 Astonishing Health Benefits Of Drinking Cucumber Juice
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    Boldsky

    8 Astonishing Health Benefits Of Drinking Cucumber Juice

    The amazing health benefits possessed by cucumbers are widely known. A cucumber can offer health advantages both inside and out, plus they contain vitamins such as vitamins K, C and A, as well as potassium and calcium. Likewise, juicing cucumbers will

  • Osteoporosis In Men: Risk Factors And Tips To Prevent It
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    Boldsky

    Osteoporosis In Men: Risk Factors And Tips To Prevent It

    Osteoporosis is the single major cause of bone problems in adults. It can affect anyone irrespective of gender, however, is mostly reported in women. However, a large number of cases of men with osteoporosis are being reported in recent times. Osteoporosis

  • Bronchiectasis: Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis And Treatment
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    Boldsky

    Bronchiectasis: Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis And Treatment

    A chronic condition where the walls of the bronchi are thickened from inflammation and infection is known as bronchiectasis . People with this condition experience frequent and periodic flare-ups of breathing difficulties. This condition usually occurs when there is irreversible

  • What Is Carrageenan? Its Uses, Benefits And Side Effects
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    Boldsky

    What Is Carrageenan? Its Uses, Benefits And Side Effects

    Carrageenan is an additive, made from parts of various red algae or seaweeds. It is used to thicken, emulsify, and preserve foods and drinks. Also called Irish moss, the natural ingredient used for medicines. Used to treat coughs, bronchitis, tuberculosis, and

  • World Blood Donor Day 2019: Health Benefits Of Donating Blood
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    Boldsky

    World Blood Donor Day 2019: Health Benefits Of Donating Blood

    World blood donor day falls on June 14. Organised by the World Health Organisation, world blood donor day celebrates and recognises the voluntary blood donors for their life-saving help; along with raising awareness on the importance of blood donation. The World

  • 9 Incredible Health Benefits Of Guavas
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    Boldsky

    9 Incredible Health Benefits Of Guavas

    Guava is a sweet fruit with a tangy smell. It is an oval-shaped fruit with light green or yellow skin and contains small edible seeds. The high nutrient content gives guava their innumerable health benefits. The leaves of the guava tree

  • What are the symptoms of the disease and how can it be treated?
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    The Independent

    What are the symptoms of the disease and how can it be treated?

    Parkinson's disease is the world's second most common neurodegenerative disorder, behind Alzheimer's disease.While it's unknown exactly why people develop the condition, according to Parkinson's UK, experts believe its a combination of genetic and environmental factors that contribute to the damage of nerve cells in the brain.So what are the symptoms of Parkinson's disease and how can it be treated? Here's everything you need to know. What is Parkinson's disease?Parkinson's disease is a degenerative neurological condition.This means that over time the brain of an individual living with the disease becomes more damaged, the NHS explains.A person living with Parkinson's disease doesn't have enough of the chemical dopamine in their brain, the Parkinson's Foundation states.Dopamine is responsible for transmitting signals between nerve cells in the brain.When an individual experiences a loss of nerve cells in the brain, this causes a reduction in the quantity of dopamine in the brain. What are the symptoms?The main symptoms of Parkinson's disease include involuntary shaking (otherwise known as tremors), movement that's slower than usual and stiffness in the muscles, the NHS outlines.Other symptoms may include difficulty balancing, nerve pain, incontinence, insomnia, excessive sweating, depression and anxiety.For more information about the symptoms of Parkinson's disease, visit the NHS here. How many people does it affect?Around 145,000 people in the UK are affected by Parkinson's disease, Parkinson's UK explains.This means that around one in every 350 adults is living with the degenerative condition.According to the NHS, symptoms of Parkinson's usually develop after the age of 50.However, for every one in 20 people affected by the disease, symptoms may appear when they're under the age of 40.The Parkinson's Foundation outlines that men are 1.5 more likely than women to be affected by the condition.High-profile individuals to have been diagnosed with Parkinson's include former US president George H. W. Bush, Back to the Future star Michael J. Fox and boxing legend Muhammad Ali. How can it be treated?While there is no known cure for Parkinson's disease, symptoms may be controlled through treatment.The most common form of treatment used for the condition is medication, Parkinson's UK states."Drug treatments aim to increase the level of dopamine that reaches the brain and stimulate the parts of the brain where dopamine works," the charity explains.The medication used to treat Parkinson's disease varies according to each patient.This is because as symptoms of the disorder progress, the drugs used to treat the condition may need to be changed.While drug treatment may help to manage Parkinson's symptoms, it cannot slow the progression of the disease.The NHS explains that those living with Parkinson's disease may also undergo physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and, in rare cases, brain surgery to treat the condition.For more information about Parkinson's disease, visit Parkinson's UK.

  • Pregnant women’s ‘safety bubble’ expands during third trimester to ‘keep danger at arm’s length’
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    The Independent

    Pregnant women’s ‘safety bubble’ expands during third trimester to ‘keep danger at arm’s length’

    A pregnant woman's "safety bubble" enlarges during her third trimester, a new study has discovered.Scientists from Anglia Ruskin University and the department of obstetrics and gynaecology at Addenbrooke's Hospital carried out an investigation to determine how a mother's sense of peripersonal space alters during pregnancy.An individual's peripersonal space is the area of space immediately around their body, and is widely regarded as measuring at approximately an arm's length away.For the study, which was published in journal Scientific Reports, the researchers assessed 85 pregnant women aged between 21 and 43 by having them take part in an audio-tactile reaction time task 20 weeks into their pregnancies, at 34 weeks and eight weeks after giving birth.The audio-tactile test involved the participants experiencing tapping sensations on their abdomens while being exposed to noise from loudspeakers.The team also assessed a control group of women who were not pregnant.The team assessed 37 pregnant women and 19 control women during the first testing session; 28 pregnant women and 17 control women during the second testing session; and 20 pregnant women and 15 control women during the third testing session.According to the study's findings, a pregnant woman's sense of personal space increases during the third trimester of pregnancy.The researchers state that this "may represent a mechanism to protect the vulnerable abdomen from injury from surrounding objects".Dr Flavia Cardini, senior lecturer in psychology at Anglia Ruskin University and lead author of the study, says that the expanded peripersonal space is "the brain's way of ensuring danger is kept at arm's length"."Pregnancy involves massive and rapid changes to the body both externally, as the body suddenly changes shape, and internally, while the foetus is growing," adds Dr Cardini.Dr Cardini states that the results of the study indicate that when the body goes through "significantly large changes" during pregnancy, the "maternal brain" also makes changes to the immediate area around the body.The researchers found that during the second trimester of pregnancy and eight weeks following childbirth, the women did not exhibit any change to their sense of personal space.Earlier this year, it was reported that exercising during pregnancy can help to protect children from obesity later in life.While previous studies had shown that exercise by obese women during pregnancy can prove beneficial for their children, this study demonstrated that the same can be said for women who aren't obese.“Based on our findings, we recommend that women - whether or not they are obese or have diabetes - exercise regularly during pregnancy because it benefits their children’s metabolic health," said Jun Seok Son, a doctoral student at Washington State University who carried out the study.

  • UK named among least family-friendly countries in new study
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    The Independent

    UK named among least family-friendly countries in new study

    The UK is one of the least family-friendly countries in the developed world, a new study finds.Researchers for Unicef analysed the policies on child care and parental leave of the 41 countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).The findings showed that the UK ranked in the bottom 10 of the worst countries for maternity leave, at 34th in the table, offering just six weeks' parental leave at 90 per cent of pay and 33 weeks at a lower rate. The data suggests the latter is equivalent to 12 weeks of full pay, and brings the UK behind offers from the likes of France, Germany and Sweden.Meanwhile, Estonia was found to be the most generous of the countries listed, offering women 85 weeks’ maternity leave at full pay after having a baby, followed by Hungary (72 weeks) and Bulgaria (61 weeks).Among the countries that have a paid leave policy for mothers, New Zealand and Australia were found to offer the least at just eight weeks of leave at full pay. The US offers no time, ranking it the worst for maternity leave.When it comes to paternity leave, the UK ranked 28th in the list, offering fathers two weeks' statutory paternity leave at £148.68 per week.However, the Department of Business last year said that the take-up by eligible fathers “could be as low as two per cent”, with financial issues cited as the primary reasons.Japan is the only country listed in the table that offers at least six months at full pay for fathers. However, Unicef found that only one in 20 fathers in the country took paid leave in 2017.Similarly, South Korea has the second longest period of paid paternity leave available, but fathers were found to make up just one in six of all parents who take parental leave.The researchers behind Unicef’s report say that paid paternity leave helps fathers bond with their babies, contributes to healthy infant and child development, lowers maternal depression and increases gender equality. As a result, the organisation is calling for national policies ensuring paid paternity leave and encouraging fathers to use it.Liam Sollis, head of policy and advocacy at Unicef UK, says: “Evidence shows that a child’s brain develops the fastest in its early years, and that during this period parents and caregivers have a vital role in providing nurturing interactions, good nutrition and sensory and motor stimulation.”Parental leave legislation in the UK entitles parents to share up to 50 weeks of leave and up to 37 weeks of pay during the first year after the child is born or, in the case of adoption, placed with the family.The UK’s Shared Parental Leave (SPL) can be used in blocks “separated by periods of work, or take[n] all in one go”, the Government states. Parents can also choose to take time off work together or to stagger the leave and pay.However, only 1 per cent of new parents used shared parental leave last year, according to research from the Trades Union Congress, prompting calls for an overhaul of the system.Just 9,200 new parents took up shared leave in 2018 out of more than 900,000 who were eligible, the study found.“UK working parents and caregivers still face major challenges balancing work and their caregiving responsibilities,” adds Sollis.“While the UK government is taking steps to review and raise awareness of family friendly policies, take-up of shared parental leave, particularly amongst fathers, remains unacceptably low, and governments and businesses need to do more to tackle the financial, cultural and administrative obstacles that many families face.”According to data from 29 countries listed in the report, parents of young children in the UK were the most likely to cite cost as the reason why they do not use formal nursery childcare.However, in Czech Republic, Denmark and Sweden, finances were an issue for less than one in 100 parents who said that they had an unmet need for childcare services.According to the 2018 Global Gender Gap Report, published by the World Economic Forum in October, it will take an estimated 202 years for economic equality between men and women to be achieved.

  • 11 Herbs That Help Manage Diabetes
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    Boldsky

    11 Herbs That Help Manage Diabetes

    One of the most common health conditions to affect people, irrespective of age and gender, diabetes is of two types, type 1 and type 2. About 90 per cent of the cases diagnosed worldwide is type 2, where the body does

  • Father’s Day 2019: When is it and what are the best deals?
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    The Independent

    Father’s Day 2019: When is it and what are the best deals?

    Father's Day – the international celebration of fathers, paternal guardians and other familial role models – is just around the corner.Numerous people across the country will be spending Father's Day with their families and loved ones, going out for meals and exchanging gifts and cards to mark the occasion.From the date to the best gift deals around, here's everything you need to know about Father's Day: When is it?This year, Father's Day falls on Sunday 16 June in the UK.It always takes place on the third Sunday of June, as it also does in several countries including Uganda, Turkey, Bangladesh and Mexico.Father's Day is commemorated on various different dates in nations across the globe, such as in Switzerland, where it always takes place on the first Sunday in June.During the Middle Ages, an annual celebration of fatherhood was observed on 19 March in Catholic Europe, on the same date as the feast day of Saint Joseph.The modern iteration of Father's Day as we know it today began being celebrated in the US in the early 20th century.It began being commemorated as a result of the success of Mother's Day, which stemmed from the religious observance of Mothering Sunday.The first observance of a "Father's Day" was held on 5 July 1908, in Fairmont, West Virginia. How is it celebrated?Father's Day is widely regarded as a secular celebration, an occasion on which fathers and guardians are celebrated by their families and loved ones.In the Roman Catholic tradition, fathers are honoured on Saint Joseph's Day, on 19 March.It's custom on Father's Day to present your father or male guardian with a card and a gift as a token of your appreciation.Some also spend their Sundays going out for meals with their fathers or going on days out with them.Last year, stationery company Paperchase was praised for creating a line of Father's Day cards for single mothers. Here are some of the best deals around for Father's Day Enjoy some laughsWhy not treat your dad by taking him to a comedy night this Father's Day?This deal will give you your pick from a wide range of comedy nights taking place in the UK, during which you can expect up to three comedians to deliver hilarious entertainment.You'll also be given access to an after-show party at selected locations.Comedy night for two: £25, virginexperiencedays.co.uk. Suave scent> View this post on Instagram> > Whether he's 1 in a million, super strong or a complete champion. No matter what type of Dad he is, we've got something for everyone this Father's Day. Shop the link in bio. . . . . fathersday pacorabanne armani perfume fragrance scent aftershave fathersdaygifting> > A post shared by The Perfume Shop (@theperfumeshop) on Jun 9, 2019 at 2:00am PDTThe Perfume Shop is offering plenty of deals on selected perfumes in the lead-up to Father's Day.The Hugo Boss eau de toilette "Boss Bottled United" is currently reduced from £87 to £42.99, while Ralph Lauren's "Polo Red" is reduced from £64 to £39.99.For more information, visit the perfumeshop.com. The ultimate pamper kitLookfantastic is currently offering a limited edition collection of cosmetic products at a heavily discounted price especially for Father's Day.Worth £136, this gift bundle includes a Molton Brown Tobacco Absolute Bath and Shower Gel, Refinery Eye Gel, an Elemis TFM Deep Cleanse Facial Wash and more.Limited Edition Father's Day collection: £49, lookfantastic.com. Capture the momentCamera Jungle is currently offering a 15 per cent discount across the site for Father's Day.Using the discount FATHER15 at checkout, you can bag bargains on a range of photographic equipment.For more information, visit camerajungle.co.uk. Fancy a tipple?> View this post on Instagram> > A post shared by HonestBrew (@honestbrew) on May 16, 2019 at 9:00am PDTIn honour of Father's Day, Honest Brew is offering beer bundles at massively discounted prices.A nine-beer bundle, worth £50, now costs £29.90 and includes the nine beers in addition to a £10 voucher, a beer glass and a pair of socks.Meanwhile, a six-beer bundle has been reduced from £42.90 to £24.90.For more information, visit honestbrew.co.uk Unleash your inner superhero> View this post on Instagram> > A post shared by CAPOWCosplay (@capowcosplay) on Mar 3, 2019 at 2:46pm PSTThis photo shoot experience is the ultimate gift for any father who shares a proclivity for superheroes with their children.Reduced from £185 down to £25, Capow Portraits if offering fathers and their children the chance to dress up as their favourite superhero, take part in a photo shoot against realistic movie backgrounds and take home a 12" x 8" print.Father and child Superhero Photo Shoot by Capow Portraits: £25, virginexperiencedays.co.uk. Go for a driveIf your father fancies himself a bit of a petrolhead, then he's going to love taking a supercar for a spin.With this experience, reduced from £99 to £59, your father will given the choice to test drive elite cars including Ferraris, Lamborghinis, Aston Martins and more.The experience lasts for approximately two hours, which includes an introduction and safety briefing.Double Supercar Driving Blast with High Speed Passenger Ride: £59, redletterdays.co.uk. Take your father to new heights> View this post on Instagram> > A post shared by The View from The Shard (@shardview) on May 10, 2019 at 2:58am PDTHow do you like the idea of a three-course meal at an Italian restaurant before taking in the views of the capital?For £89, reduced from £118.90, you can treat your father to a three-course dinner at Marco Pierre White, a short walk away from The Shard, before ascending London's famous glass skyscraper.Your meal will also include a glass of prosecco each.For more information, visit buyagift.co.uk.For more Father's Day present inspiration, visit our IndyBest gift guide here.

  • Piers Morgan criticises ‘bonkers’ reaction to ‘triggering’ GCSE calorie question for pupils with eating disorders
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    The Independent

    Piers Morgan criticises ‘bonkers’ reaction to ‘triggering’ GCSE calorie question for pupils with eating disorders

    Piers Morgan has described criticism of a GCSE calorie question as “bonkers” after several Twitter users say it could be triggering for pupils with eating disorders.The question appeared in Edexcel’s calculator paper, which was sat by candidates on Thursday 6 June, the Times Educational Supplement reports.The question asked about how many calories a woman had consumed for breakfast, prompting several Twitter users to argue that it might affect people who have struggled with an eating disorder.The question on the paper read: “There are 84 calories in 100g of banana. There are 87 calories in 100g of yogurt. Priti has 60g of banana and 150g of yogurt for breakfast. Work out the total number of calories in this breakfast”.During a segment on Good Morning Britain on Wednesday, the presenter quoted Caroline Nokes, Conservative MP for Romsey and Southampton North, who tweeted him to explain why the question may affect certain individuals.“Taking exams whilst suffering an eating disorder is tough enough without having @piersmorgan suggest you shouldn’t be taking exams if question on calorie counting triggers issues – total lack of compassion and understanding of serious mental health condition edexcelmaths,” Nokes tweeted the presenter.> Taking exams whilst suffering an eating disorder is tough enough without having @piersmorgan suggest you shouldn’t be taking exams if question on calorie counting triggers issues - total lack of compassion and understanding of serious mental health condition edexcelmaths> > — Caroline Nokes (@carolinenokes) > > June 12, 2019The broadcaster questioned Nokes’ argument, adding: “This country is going completely bonkers.”He continued, saying: “We don’t rewrite the entire maths paper which has a perfectly reasonable question because somebody may have a trigger moment.”The debate has prompted mixed reactions on Twitter with several agreeing with the 54-year-old's argument.Replying to Nokes' comment on social media, Morgan wrote: "Oh please. It’s utter snowflake nonsense. Have you even read the question?"One Twitter user commented on the star's post: “This is utter madness, there will always be someone who is offended by something....but a maths question shouldn’t be one of them!”“Totally agree with you Piers! It’s getting ridiculous! We are getting to the point of not daring to speak to anyone about anything for fear of upsetting them over something!!” commented another.> This is utter madness,there will always be someone who is offended by something....but a maths question shouldn’t be one of them! 🤯> > — Emma Shirley (@EmmaShi55557936) > > June 12, 2019> Oh please. It’s utter snowflake nonsense. Have you even read the question? https://t.co/amkBQ6AYH0> > — Piers Morgan (@piersmorgan) > > June 12, 2019> Totally agree with you Piers! It’s getting ridiculous! We are getting to the point of not daring to speak to anyone about anything for fear of upsetting them over something!! 😡> > — Julia Hanson (@Lincjules5555) > > June 12, 2019However, others have pointed out how affecting the question may be to certain individuals who have been affected by eating disorders.One user commented added: “Being in recovery of an eating disorder is one of the most difficult and frustrating things ever and a question like this can easily trigger someone years after they have had it so pls go and f**king educate urself thanks [sic].”Another added: “As somebody who was hospitalised for anorexia in my final GSCE year this question would have been really difficult for me. Piers Morgan can f**k off, his ignorance is showing through again.[sic]”One user tweeted: “Okay, yes it’s just a maths question and as someone with anorexia I’ve had to get used to working out the numbers and ignoring the context, but the reality is that everyone is at different points in their journey and the topic is easily avoided so why risk triggering relapse?”> Being in recovery of an eating disorder is one of the most difficult and frustrating things ever and a question like this can easily trigger someone years after they have had it so pls go and fucking educate urself thanks> > — swaiba (@swaibaf) > > June 12, 2019> As somebody who was hospitalised for anorexia in my final GSCE year this question would have been really difficult for me. Piers Morgan can fuck off, his ignorance is showing through again: https://t.co/no4U3E1tMR> > — Rachel (@OpenMindMH) > > June 12, 2019> Okay, yes it’s just a maths question and as someone with anorexia I’ve had to get used to working out the numbers and ignoring the context, but the reality is that everyone is at different points in their journey and the topic is easily avoided so why risk triggering relapse?> > — Lily Wilson (@LilyWilson_xx) > > June 12, 2019On Tuesday, a spokesperson from Pearson – which owns the exam board EdExcel – responded to the backlash on Twitter and said the company has reviewed the question and believes it to be “valid”.> pic.twitter.com/QCflgsZu3Z> > — Pearson Edexcel (@PearsonEdexcel) > > June 11, 2019However, they invited students to complain if they felt “triggered” by the question.“We encourage any student who thinks that this question may have impacted their performance to get in contact with us via their school,” a segment of the Tweet reads.Tom Quinn, director of external affairs at eating disorder charity BEAT says referencing to counting calories can be triggering for people with or in recovery from an eating disorder and can therefore cause significant distress.“We would urge greater awareness of how such references can affect people with or vulnerable to eating disorders, and given that young people are most at risk of these serious mental illnesses, we would encourage exam boards to avoid such material in their exams,” Quinn told The Independent.According to the organisation, approximately 1.25 million people in the UK are estimated to have an eating disorder. Around 25 per cent of those affected by an eating disorder are male.If you have been affected by this article, you can contact the following organisations for support:mind.org.ukbeateatingdisorders.org.uknhs.uk/livewell/mentalhealthmentalhealth.org.uksamaritans.org

  • Beyoncé and Solange's mother Tina Knowles-Lawson reveals she devoted special days to each child
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    The Independent

    Beyoncé and Solange's mother Tina Knowles-Lawson reveals she devoted special days to each child

    Tina Knowles-Lawson has spoken about what it was like raising her daughters Beyoncé and Solange Knowles, revealing a special tradition she practised throughout their childhoods.Over the weekend, Knowles-Lawson attended Summit21, a two-day conference in Atlanta which celebrates black girls and women.The businesswoman and fashion designer was invited to speak at the conference, during which she opened up about how she managed time spent with her two daughters during their younger years."One thing I'm really happy I did was I gave each of my kids a day," Knowles-Lawson said."As Solange got older, I would spend Wednesdays with her and help with homework and do those types of things and just devote that day to her, and then one day to Bey."Knowles-Lawson explained that doing this made Beyoncé and Solange feel as though they were receiving adequate attention, a tricky feat to achieve with children."You know because kids, no matter how much you give them love and attention, it's never enough," the 65-year-old added."I mean I'm sure, everybody who has kids knows, you can take them to [now-closed theme park] AstroWorld, to eat, and they'll still say, 'Well what else are we going to do?'"Knowles-Lawson is known to have a close relationship with her daughters.In January, she revealed while speaking on Maria Shriver's Meaningful Conversations podcast that she, Beyoncé, Solange, her niece Angie Beyincé and former Destiny's Child member Kelly Rowland are all on a group text."It's like I have four girls," Knowles-Lawson said. "And it's so funny because we are always on group chats."Earlier this month, the fashion designer hosted the 2019 Wearable Art Gala in Santa Monica, California with her husband, Richard Lawson.The theme of the event was "A Journey to the Pride Lands", taking inspiration from Jon Favreau's soon-to-be-released remake of The Lion King.Beyoncé attended the event in a gold ensemble which paid homage to the character she plays in the film, Nala.The outfit featured an embellished bodysuit, cape, fringed heels and a lion face, with feathers protruding from the lion's face to emulate a mane.

  • John Legend highlights double standards for mothers and fathers
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    The Independent

    John Legend highlights double standards for mothers and fathers

    John Legend has called out the double standards mothers and fathers face when raising their children, opening up about the castigation Chrissy Teigen faced following the birth of their first child.In April 2016, Legend and Teigen’s daughter, Luna, was born. Just over a week later, the celebrity couple went on their first date night as parents.“People were shaming Chrissy for leaving the house, and didn’t say anything bad to me,” Legend tells Romper with regards to the evening.“Look, we’re both parents and we’re both going out. If you think that’s not appropriate – and first of all, you shouldn’t think that’s not appropriate – if you’re going to blame somebody, blame both of us, not just the mother.”Legend has witnessed Teigen being shamed for her parenting methods on several occasions over the years, such as when the model engaged in public discussions about undergoing IVF and when Internet trolls questioned why her son, Miles, wore a head-shaping helmet.“I think it’s just a lot of these cultural traditions that have been too limiting and not inclusive enough over the years,” the singer states, adding that he hopes societal norms have started to “shed”.Legend outlines how those who criticise mothers for their parenting methods while praising fathers for doing the bare minimum have “lowered the bar”.“All the times when we’ve lowered the bar and have said dad is babysitting when he’s taking care of his own kids – no he’s not, he’s just parenting,” the La La Land star says.The 40-year-old explains that these “gender norms”, where the mother is expected to take sole care of the children while the father works, are “baked into how people are having these conversations”. “I just wish people would think more about that and what that means,” Legend adds.Another aspect of parenting that Legend has taken heed of is the assumption that fathers won’t change their babies’ nappies.According to recent research conducted by Pampers, nine out of 10 fathers have gone into a men’s public bathroom that doesn’t have a baby changing table.“It’s kind of assumed dads won’t change diapers, so facilities are built in a way that bakes that assumption in,” Legend says.“And [that] then perpetuates the fact that dads won’t change diapers because they don’t even have a place to do it.”In order to combat the lack of baby changing areas in men’s public bathrooms, Legend has partnered with Pampers and Florida father Donte Palmer to launch a new campaign, which promises to provide 5,000 baby changing tables in public bathrooms across North America by 2021.In 2018, a photograph of Palmer changing his son’s nappy while crouching in a men’s public bathroom went viral, highlighting the need for the addition of baby changing tables in men’s bathrooms.Legend stresses the importance of acknowledging the “active role dads are playing their babies’ lives”, stating that he believes the campaign will pave the way for “more inclusive parenting”.

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    Strobe lighting at dance festivals ‘triples risk of epileptic seizures’

    The use of strobe lighting at electronic dance festivals may more than triple the risk of epileptic seizures for susceptible individuals, researchers have warned.It’s long-been known that exposure to flashing lights can trigger seizures among a minority of individuals with epilepsy, a condition known as photosensitive epilepsy.However, the risks associated between those who attend electronic dance music festivals where strobe lighting is used and those more likely to experience epileptic seizures are not widely known.According to a new study published in the journal BMJ Open, the increased risk of seizures caused by strobe lighting at dance music festivals may affect people who are unaware that they have epilepsy.Experts from medical centres in the Netherlands conducted a study assessing 400,343 people who attended 28 daytime and night-time electronic dance music festivals across the country throughout 2015.The data was originally collated by Event Medical Services, a company which provides medical services to almost all dance music festivals in the Netherlands.Of those assessed, 241,543 people attended night-time festivals where strobe lighting was used, and 158,800 attended daytime festivals where strobe lighting was used.The strobe lighting at the daytime festivals was reported as being less intense, due to the sunlight.Overall, there were 2,776 incidents where festivalgoers required medical assistance at the 28 festivals, 39 of which were due to epileptic seizures.There were 30 reported cases of epileptic fits during the night-time festivals, and nine during the daytime festivals.While the researchers say that their study is observational, they write that they believe their finding that risk of a seizure is more than three times more likely at a night-time festival where strobe lighting is more intense is “externally valid”.They add that other factors – such as if the festivalgoers had taken ecstasy, were sleep deprived or using other forms of medication – may have also increased their likelihood of suffering epileptic seizures.“Regardless of whether stroboscopic light effects are solely responsible or whether sleep deprivation and/or substance abuse also play a role, the appropriate interpretation is that large [electronic dance music] festivals, especially during night-time, probably cause at least a number of people per event to suffer epileptic seizures,” the researchers state.“Given the large dataset, we believe our findings are externally valid, at least for other [electronic dance music] festivals in other countries which generally attract a similar audience.”The researchers add that organisers of electronic dance music festivals do not provide adequate warnings about the associated risk between strobe lighting and epileptic seizures.“Concert organisers and audience should warn against the risk of seizures and promote precautionary measures in susceptible individuals,” they conclude.The researchers of the study were prompted to carry out their investigation following an incident when a 20-year-old man with no history of epilepsy suddenly collapsed and experience a fit at an electronic dance festival.The festivalgoer was reported as having had an “’aura-like’ experience”, and denied consuming any alcohol, drugs or medication.“When asked about pre-seizure symptoms, he remembered an urge to turn his eyes away from the strong stroboscopic light effects coming from the stage in front of him, because they elicited what he referred to as discomforting sensations,” the researchers write.Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders in the world, affecting approximately 50 million people worldwide.Those living with the life-long condition may be prone to experiencing frequent, unpredictable seizures, which occur when sudden bursts of electrical activity happen in the brain.Epilepsy affects one in 100 people in the UK, Epilepsy Action states.According to the Epilepsy Society, one in 20 people are likely to experience a one-off epileptic seizure at some point in their lifetime.However, this does not necessarily mean that they have epilepsy.For information about what you can do if you witness someone having an epileptic seizure, visit Epilepsy Action’s website here.

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