• 7 Ways To Reduce Your Wheezing Naturally
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    7 Ways To Reduce Your Wheezing Naturally

    Wheezing occurs when there is an inflammation and narrowing of the airways. The most common causes are asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), both of which cause narrowing and spasms in the small airways of the lungs . Other common

  • What is heatstroke, what are the symptoms and how can it be treated?
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    The Independent

    What is heatstroke, what are the symptoms and how can it be treated?

    The Met Office has warned that a potentially dangerous heatwave is set to spread across Europe, with temperatures expected to surpass 40C in the hottest parts of the continent.With temperatures predicted to rise to 32C in the UK this weekend, Britons unused to the scorching weather will need to take precautionary measures to ensure they don't suffer from heat exhaustion or heatstroke.If an individual's body is unable to cool down and they develop heatstroke, then their health could be at serious risk.So, how can you spot the signs of heatstroke and how can you treat it?Here's everything you need to know: What is heatstroke?Heatstroke, otherwise known as sunstroke, occurs when a person's body temperature has become overheated to a harmful degree, St John Ambulance explains.An individual may develop heatstroke if they've been suffering from heat exhaustion.When a person spends too much time in the sun or in hot temperatures, they may become too dehydrated.At this point, they may stop sweating, which means their body will no longer be able to cool itself down. This can result in them developing heatstroke.If an individual experiencing heat exhaustion is able to cool down within 30 minutes, then their health shouldn't be at serious risk, the NHS states.However, if they develop heatstroke, then an ambulance should be called on 999 or 112. What are the symptoms?Symptoms of heat exhaustion include experiencing a headache, dizziness, loss of appetite, nausea, excessive sweating, cramping, an increased heart rate, a temperature of 38C or above and feeling very thirsty, the NHS outlines.Adults and children who experience heat exhaustion tend to exhibit similar symptoms. However, children may also appear sleepy.If a person displaying these signs hasn't improved within 30 minutes, then their condition may have developed into heatstroke.Symptoms of heatstroke include lack of sweat even if they feel very hot, a temperature of 40C or above, shortness of breathe, confusion, experiencing a seizure, losing consciousness and becoming unresponsive. How can you help someone experiencing heatstroke?If you spot that someone may be suffering from heat exhaustion, then they should be moved to a cool environment, the NHS advises.You should do all that you can to help them cool down, including ensuring that they drink lots of water, cooling their skin with a spray or sponge and having them lie down with their feet slightly raised.If they haven't improved in 30 minutes and you believe they may have developed heatstroke, then an ambulance should be called on 999 or 112.While waiting for the ambulance to arrive, St John Ambulance recommends trying to cool them down by either wrapping them in a cold wet sheet or sponging them down.If their temperature appears to go back to normal, then replace the wet sheet with a dry one.As you wait for the arrival of a paramedic, keep checking their breathing, pulse and level of response, St John Ambulance says.If at any point they become unresponsive, then you must check their breathing and ensure their airway is open.For more information on how to look after a person who has become unresponsive, click here. How can heatstroke be prevented?There are certain measures you can take to prevent heat exhaustion and heatstroke in hot temperatures, the NHS states.These include drinking lots of cold drinks, bathing in cool water, wearing loose clothing, avoiding the sun during peak sun hours and not drinking too much alcohol.The NHS advises keeping a close eye on those who may be more susceptible to heat exhaustion and heatstroke, including children, older individuals and those who have long-term health conditions.For all the latest news on the UK weather, click here.

  • Weighted Blankets: Benefits And Potential Dangers
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    Boldsky

    Weighted Blankets: Benefits And Potential Dangers

    Weighted blankets were once considered a powerful tool by plenty of therapists and psychiatry clinicians. These are also sometimes referred to as gravity blankets and have gone mainstream now. However, there still exists a lot of debate as to whether weighted

  • Green Beans: Health Benefits, Risks, & Recipes
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    Boldsky

    Green Beans: Health Benefits, Risks, & Recipes

    Green beans are a versatile vegetable which are added in a wide array of dishes and offer great health benefits to people who consume them daily. They can be eaten in both raw and cooked form. Green beans, also known as

  • IVF success rate has peaked at one in four, researchers claim
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    The Independent

    IVF success rate has peaked at one in four, researchers claim

    The success rate for women undergoing in vitro fertilisation (IVF) treatment has peaked at one in four, a new study has found.According to new research, those who undergo IVF have a 27.1 per cent possibility of the procedure resulting in pregnancy.Meanwhile, those who undergo a similar procedure called intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) have a 24.3 per cent chance of conceiving.During the procedure of IVF, an egg is taken from a woman's ovaries and fertilised with a sperm in a laboratory. The fertilised egg is then reinserted into the woman's womb.ICSI is the most common treatment used in cases of male infertility, the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) states.The new findings were presented at the annual European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) meeting in Vienna this week.The researchers assessed 800,000 IVF and ICSI treatment cycles performed in 2016, which resulted in the birth of 165,000 babies.The study represents the largest insight into the success rates of assisted reproduction in Europe.Dr Christian de Geyter, chair of the ESHRE's European IVF Monitoring Consortium, said that the success rates for IVF and ICSI "appear to have reached a peak"."Success rates have stabilised although outcome in egg donation and with use of frozen embryos is still moving upwards," Dr de Geyter said.While the success rates of IVF and ICSI treatments appear to have plateaued, popularity in the treatments which incorporate frozen embryos is on the rise, Dr de Geyter pointed out."The biggest upwards movement, however, is from treatments with frozen eggs, which have been revolutionised by the widespread introduction of vitrification," Dr de Geyter said.Vitrification is a form of technology which involves the freezing of an egg or embryo by cooling it at a rapid pace.Frozen embryos are fertilised eggs which are stored until a later time, when they are then inserted into the womb during a fertility treatment.Dr de Geyter tells The Independent that he believes the peaking success rate of IVF and ICSI has been caused by a decrease in fresh embryo transfers and an increase in frozen embryo transfers.Approximately half of the cases assessed by ESHRE consist of frozen embryo transfers.Fertility treatments which feature frozen embryo transfers were found to have a 30.5 per cent success rate, an increase of 1.3 per cent from the year prior.According to Dr de Geyter, 84 per cent of all assisted reproduction fertility treatments which take place in Europe are included in the ESHRE monitoring programme.The UK – where approximately 60,000 assisted reproduction fertility treatments take place on an annual basis – was not included in the study analysing data from 2016.The ESHRE reported that Spain was the most active country for assisted reproduction fertility treatments, with 140,909 performed in 2016.Meanwhile, 121,235 treatments took place in Russia and 104,733 in France.A recent study published by the University of Copenhagen found women above the age of 40 who undergo IVF may be at greater risk of breast cancer.The researchers assessed 600,000 Danish women, including 58,534 who underwent fertility treatment, for the study.

  • 18 Best Exercises To Increase Your Height
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    Boldsky

    18 Best Exercises To Increase Your Height

    Growing tall after the normal age of 18 is close to impossible. However, it does not mean that it is impossible! Your height and the process of growing taller is influenced by several factors such as environment, hormones, genes, and nutrition.

  • Raw Bananas: Nutritional Health Benefits, Risks, & Recipes
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    Boldsky

    Raw Bananas: Nutritional Health Benefits, Risks, & Recipes

    Bananas are one of those healthy and nutritious fruits which people enjoy eating any time of the day. Usually, bananas are eaten in their ripe form, but the raw bananas are also eaten too, but after cooking. Raw bananas are eaten

  • A Dietitian Shares 9 Habits She Recommends to Clients For Easy, Sustainable Weight Loss
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    PopSugar

    A Dietitian Shares 9 Habits She Recommends to Clients For Easy, Sustainable Weight Loss

    Losing weight shouldn't feel like a chore, and it shouldn't feel so restrictive that you hate every second of your "diet" and then give up. Registered dietitian Emily Tills, MS, RDN, CDN, wants you to enjoy your weight-loss journey. She told POPSUGAR she specifically works with women on how to lose weight "without feeling restricted and on a diet." She coaches her clients to use habit-based methods.

  • 12 killed by rare bacterial infection in Essex
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    The Independent

    12 killed by rare bacterial infection in Essex

    Twelve people have been killed by an outbreak of a rare bacterial infection in Essex, the NHS has said.Most of those affected were “elderly and had been receiving care for chronic wounds, in the community, either in their own homes and some in care homes”, according to the NHS Mid Essex Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG).The outbreak of invasive Group A streptococcus (iGAS) started in Braintree and spread to the Chelmsford and Maldon areas, it added. There have been 32 reported cases of the disease. An incident management team has been established to “control the incident and closely monitor the situation”.The bacteria can be found in the throat and on the skin and people may carry it without displaying any symptoms.It can live in throats and on hands for long enough to allow easy spread between people through sneezing, kissing and skin contact.The CCG said in a report that the “sometimes life-threatening GAS disease may occur when bacteria get into parts of the body where bacteria usually are not found, such as the blood, muscle, or the lungs”.Rachel Hearn, director of nursing and quality, Mid Essex CCG, said: “Our thoughts are with the families of those patients who have died. The NHS in Essex is working closely with Public Health England and other partners to manage this local incident, and extra infection control measures have been put in place to prevent the infection spreading in the area.“The risk of contracting iGAS is very low for the vast majority of people and treatment with antibiotics is very effective if started early. We will continue to work with our partners in Public Health England to investigate how this outbreak occurred and take every possible step to ensure our local community is protected.”

  • 8 Best Lifestyle Changes To Help Control Diabetes
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    8 Best Lifestyle Changes To Help Control Diabetes

    According to a study conducted by the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, the blood sugars, weight and cholesterol levels of diabetics can be lowered by adopting various preventive measures. Some studies have claimed that dietary interventions are effective for diabetes management

  • Carrots: Nutritional Health Benefits, Risks & Recipes
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    Carrots: Nutritional Health Benefits, Risks & Recipes

    Since childhood, our parents have been telling us that carrots are good for our eyes, and they surely are. Carrots are one of the healthiest vegetables; they are a good source of plant compounds like beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, lycopene, lutein, anthocyanins, and

  • Everything You Need To Know About Septoplasty
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    Everything You Need To Know About Septoplasty

    A deviated septum occurs when the septum (the wall of cartilage and bone that divides the nose into two separate nostrils) moves to one side of the nose . Some people are born with a deviated septum, whereas for others it

  • 10 Amazing Health Benefits Of Mustard Seeds, Nutrition And Recipes
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    10 Amazing Health Benefits Of Mustard Seeds, Nutrition And Recipes

    Mustard seeds are the small, round seeds of the mustard plant. Mustard seeds are one of the most helpful natural ingredients used on a daily basis. They are not only useful in cooking but also are useful for medicinal applications since

  • Judi Dench says failing eyesight caused her to give up driving: ‘I just know I’ll kill somebody if I get behind the wheel’
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    The Independent

    Judi Dench says failing eyesight caused her to give up driving: ‘I just know I’ll kill somebody if I get behind the wheel’

    Dame Judi Dench has opened up about her faltering eyesight, saying that giving up driving as a result of her failing vision was "absolutely appalling".In 2012, Dench revealed she had been diagnosed with macular degeneration, a degenerative eye condition which is the biggest cause of sight loss in the UK, according to Macular Society.However, it wasn't until 2017 that the Oscar winner stopped driving."A couple of years ago I stopped driving, which was one of the most traumatic moments of my life. It was absolutely appalling," Dench told Radio Times in the latest issue of the magazine."But I just know I'll kill somebody if I get behind the wheel of a car now."The 84-year-old added that she can no longer read the newspaper, books or do the crossword. "But, you know, you cope," Dench said.The dame is unsure when she may lose her vision entirely, saying that she doesn't ask for the predictions of medical professionals."I don't want to say. I can see enough... You adapt to it. So I ignore it altogether," Dench stated.While her failing eyesight may prevent her from reading the news, it also saved the actor from a scare during a recent close encounter with a crocodile.Dench recently travelled to the island of Borneo to film Judi Dench's Wild Borneo Adventure, a nature programme due to air on Tuesday 2 July on ITV.During a late-night boat trip on the Kinabatangan River, Dench found herself metres away from a baby crocodile.While speaking at a screening of the television show at the Royal Geographical Society in London, the Philomena star explained that multiple people had been crammed onto the small "febrile" boat."I thought we could never get any more people in, and we had [our guide] crouched at the front, and everyone going: 'Oh look, eyes over there, look at the eyes'."Thank god I am shortsighted so I couldn't see anything."During her interview with Radio Times, Dench expressed her concern that the artistic work of Harvey Weinstein and Kevin Spacey will be forgotten due to the allegations of misconduct made against them."Are we going to negate 10 years at the Old Vic and everything that he did [as artistic director] – how wonderful he's been in those films?" Dench asked, with regards to Spacey."Are we just not going to see all those films that Harvey produced?" the veteran actor added.Dench was one of the first celebrities to make a public statement denouncing Weinstein, saying she was "horrified" by his alleged actions.

  • Eat These Vitamin D-rich Foods For Improved Immunity & Bone Health
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    Boldsky

    Eat These Vitamin D-rich Foods For Improved Immunity & Bone Health

    Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that is different from other vitamins because the human body can absorb most of this vitamin when exposed to sunlight. It acts as a pro-hormone, which affects the hormone balance and immune regulation of the

  • Baby formula at Walmart recalled over concerns metal found inside
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    The Independent

    Baby formula at Walmart recalled over concerns metal found inside

    A company has recalled over 23,000 containers of baby formula amid concerns the product may contain metal.The nationwide recall of Perrigo Company's 35 oz containers of Parent’s Choice Advantage Infant Formula Milk-Based Powder with Iron was announced by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).The FDA explained the reason for the recall was because of “the potential presence of metal foreign matter” in the exclusively Walmart-sold product.The affected products will have a Lot Code of C26EVFV and a “use by” date of 26 February 2021, which can be found on the bottom of the package.“Any consumers who purchased the product should discontinue use and can visit any Walmart store for a refund,” the agency said.The FDA said that there were no reports of injury or illness related to the baby formula, rather the recall was due to “an abundance of caution stemming from a consumer report”.> Perrigo Issues Voluntary Recall For Parent’s Choice Advantage Infant Formula Milk-Based Powder With Iron https://t.co/JRygqhZwmd pic.twitter.com/eBj1BnqPHK> > — U.S. FDA (@FDArecalls) > > June 24, 2019No other Perrigo Company products or retailers are affected by the recall.Consumers who have questions about Parent’s Choice Advantage Infant Formula Milk-Based Powder with Iron are advised to contact Perrigo Consumer Affairs on 866-629-6181.The news comes months after Tyson Foods – the world’s second largest processor and marketer of chicken, beef, and pork – recalled more than 69,000 pounds of frozen chicken strips.The American food company made the decision to recall the products in March after the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) received two complaints that metal was found in the chicken strips.The affected products include the brand’s buffalo and crispy style ready-to-eat products that were produced on 30 November 2018.The Independent has contacted the Perrigo Company for comment.

  • Did You Know These Health Benefits Of Mullein?
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    Did You Know These Health Benefits Of Mullein?

    Scientifically termed as Verbascum thapsus, mullein is generally known as Verbascum. Mullein is, in fact, the general name used to describe the large genus of flowering plants. The flowers, leaves and fruit of the plant are widely used in folk and

  • 10 Natural Remedies To Treat Jaundice
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    Boldsky

    10 Natural Remedies To Treat Jaundice

    Your liver is an important organ of the body. It works by removing toxins and damaged blood cells out of the body and aids the body in processing the nutrients from food and turn them into energy. The liver secretes an

  • What is dyspraxia, what are the symptoms and how common is it?
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    The Independent

    What is dyspraxia, what are the symptoms and how common is it?

    TV presenter Rav Wilding recently opened up about being diagnosed with dyspraxia, saying he has found it "tricky" coping with the co-ordination disorder throughout his life.The Crimewatch Roadshow presenter told Press Association that dyspraxia is "kind of like dyslexia with your hands", explaining that he struggled in school when he was unable to do activities that his classmates could with ease.Signs of dyspraxia may be present from an early age, with possible symptoms including poor co-ordination skills and untidy handwriting.So what is dyspraxia, what are the symptoms and how common is it? Here's everything you need to know: What is it?Dyspraxia is a form of developmental co-ordination disorder (DCD), the Dyspraxia Foundation states.The disorder can affect fine motor skills – the co-ordination of small muscles, such as the hands and fingers – and gross motor skills – the co-ordination of large muscles, such as the arms, legs and torso.The condition may also impact a person's articulation when speaking.While the terms dyspraxia and DCD are sometimes used interchangeably, they don't always refer to the same condition when used.The NHS explains that the term "DCD" is preferred by the majority of healthcare professionals, as the term "dyspraxia" may have "several meanings"."For example, dyspraxia can be used to describe movement difficulties that occur later in life as a result of damage to the brain, such as from a stroke or head injury," the NHS adds. What are the symptoms?Signs of dyspraxia may become evident from a young age in infants and children.These symptoms include difficulty playing with toys or taking part in games that involve co-ordination skills, trouble using cutlery, untidy handwriting and an inability to do tasks such as doing up buttons or tying shoelaces, the NHS states.Other symptoms may include falling over frequently and dropping objects.However, the NHS points out that these signs may not necessarily by indicative of dyspraxia.For more information about symptoms of dyspraxia, click here. What are the causes?While there is no confirmed cause of dyspraxia, there are factors that may put a child at greater risk of developing the disorder.These include being born prematurely, weighing a below-average weight at birth, having relatives who had DCD or having a mother who drank alcohol or consumed illegal drugs during pregnancy, the NHS outlines. How common is it?Dyspraxia is more likely to affect boys than girls, states learning and attention issue organisation Understood.It is believed to affect 10 per cent of the population, the Mental Health Foundation outlines, while two per cent are estimated to be severely affected by the condition.Celebrities diagnosed with dyspraxia include Harry Potter star Daniel Radcliffe, model Cara Delevingne and singer Florence Welch. How is it treated?While children who have been diagnosed with dyspraxia may "grow out" of their symptoms, the NHS states, treatment may prove beneficial in the long run.A paediatric occupational therapist may help a child with dyspraxia learn how carry out tasks such as handling cutlery, tying their shoelaces and writing.Other health professionals that may benefit a child living with dyspraxia may include a paediatrician, a clinical psychologist and an educational psychologist.For more information about dyspraxia, you can contact a local dyspraxia support group by visiting the Dyspraxia Foundation website here.

  • 9 Dangerous Health Effects Of Smoking
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    9 Dangerous Health Effects Of Smoking

    The use of tobacco kills nearly 6 million people globally every year. According to the National Family Health Survey (NFHS-3) conducted in 2005-2006, the use of tobacco is more prevalent among the men, illiterate and poor people . Smoking makes a

  • James Middleton opens up about ‘crippling’ depression and scrutiny of his success
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    The Independent

    James Middleton opens up about ‘crippling’ depression and scrutiny of his success

    James Middleton has spoken about his “crippling” depression and being judged on his success.Earlier this year, the Duchess of Cambridge’s brother spoke candidly about his diagnosis with clinical depression, explaining that he once felt like a “complete failure” due to the condition.Now, the founder of personalised greetings business Boomf said while there was no particular reason for his depression, he could recall feeling guilty for his privileged upbringing.‘It’s what keeps you in bed, while anxiety makes you feel guilty for being there,” he told Tatler.“I thought ‘What do I have to be depressed about?’ I’ve been so lucky with my upbringing, I had all the things I wanted.“It’s not that I wanted more, but there was something that wasn’t always there... And the more I ignored it, the more it was taking over.”While his parents, Carol and Michael Middleton, knew something “wasn’t right”, the 32-year-old said he felt incapable of talking to them about how he was feeling at the time.> View this post on Instagram> > Sail away with me ⛵️ ☀️> > A post shared by James Middleton (@jmidy) on May 7, 2019 at 10:23am PDTThe entrepreneur continued: “I shut myself off, I didn’t communicate with my family at all. But there’s only so long you can hold your breath.”Following a period of therapy and time in Glen Affric – his brother-in-law James Matthews’ Scottish estate – Kate’s brother admitted to finally feeling content.“I am happy – I feel like James Middleton again,” he said. “I feel like I was when I was 13, excited about life. I feel like myself again and I couldn’t ask for more.”Elsewhere in the interview, Middleton – who is currently in a relationship with French financial expert Alizee Thevenet – spoke about the pressure of being in the public eye.Following Kate’s wedding to the Duke of Cambridge in 2011, the then 23-year-old James said that the sudden media attention around him made him question his sense of self, his abilities and his business.“Suddenly, and very publicly, I was being judged about whether I was a success of a failure,” he said.“That does put pressure on you. Because in my mind I’m doing this irrespective of my family and events that have happened.”On his relationship with the royals, he added: “I lead a separate life to them. “If there’s interest in me, great. If there’s interest in me because of them, that’s different.”In his January essay for the Daily Mail, Middleton described depression as “an absence of feelings” and revealed that his eldest sister’s work with mental health charity Heads Together was partly what inspired him to come forward with his own story of the condition.“I know I’m richly blessed and live a privileged life. But it did not make me immune to depression,” he wrote.“It is tricky to describe the condition. It is not merely sadness. It is an illness, a cancer of the mind.”If you have been affected by any issues mentioned in this article, you can contact The Samaritans for free on 116 123 or any of the following mental health organisations:mind.org.uknhs.uk/livewell/mentalhealthmentalhealth.org.uksamaritans.organxietyuk.org.ukThe full interview can be seen in the August issue of Tatler, available on newsstands and digital download on Thursday 27 June 2019.

  • How to spot someone having a stroke and what to do
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    The Independent

    How to spot someone having a stroke and what to do

    On Monday, the family of former deputy prime minister John Prescott revealed he has been admitted to hospital after suffering a stroke.A statement about Prescott's health, posted on Twitter, said that the 81-year-old was taken to Hull Royal Infirmary on Friday.The family said they wanted to praise the "swift actions" of the ambulance staff and the doctors and nurses at the hospital's A&E stroke unit.According to the Stroke Association, strokes are the fourth leading cause of death in the UK, and the cause of 400 childhood deaths across the country every year.There are different types of strokes and recovery length depends on the severity of the attack.The sooner someone receives treatment, the less the brain will be damaged.> A statement from the family of John Prescott. pic.twitter.com/0wgCNYn0ZV> > — John Prescott (@johnprescott) > > June 24, 2019Here’s everything you need to know about strokes, from how to recognise the symptoms to what the different types of stroke are: What is a stroke?Described by the UK’s Stroke Association as a “brain attack”, a stroke happens when the blood supply to the brain is cut off.This prevents key nutrients and oxygen from getting to the brain, causing severe damage to the brain cells, which can impair a person’s speech and the way they move and think. What are the different types of stroke?There are three types of stroke.Ischaemic strokes, which are most common, occur when an artery that supplies blood to your brain becomes blocked by a blood clot. The blood clots usually form in areas where the arteries have become narrowed over time due to a buildup of fatty deposits; this process is known as atherosclerosis.Haemorrhagic strokes happen when there is bleeding in or around the brain caused by a blood vessel rupturing. This kills all of the surrounding brain cells.The third type, according to the British Heart Foundation, is a mini-stroke, which is caused by a brief reduction in blood supply to part of the brain. These kinds of stokes, sometimes referred to as transient ischaemic attacks, shouldn’t cause permanent damage to the brain, and most symptoms should pass within 24 hours. What causes a stroke?For ischaemic strokes, which are caused by narrowing arteries, certain things such as smoking, obesity, diabetes, excessive alcohol consumption and high cholesterol can be triggers.Arteries naturally narrow as you get older, so elderly people are also more at risk.The main causes for haemorrhagic strokes, which are less common, are stress, lack of exercise, obesity and smoking. How to spot someone is having a strokeThe symptoms for a stroke depend on the person and the type of stroke, though the NHS uses the F.A.S.T acronym to list the main signs as: * Face – the face may have dropped on one side, the person may not be able to smile, or their mouth or eye may have drooped. * Arms – the person with suspected stroke may not be able to lift both arms and keep them there because of weakness or numbness in one arm. * Speech – their speech may be slurred or garbled, or the person may not be able to talk at all despite appearing to be awake. * Time – it’s time to dial 999 immediately if you notice any of these signs or symptoms.If you suspect you or someone else is having a stroke, the NHS advises phoning 999 immediately and asking for an ambulance. What happens after someone has had a stroke?Recovery from a stroke will vary depending on how much damage has been caused to the brain.Some people will recover quickly, but others will need long-term support from a range of specialists, such as language therapists, dietitians, physiotherapists and psychologists.After a stroke, a person’s cognitive functions (communication, spatial awarenesses, memory and concentration) can be severely compromised, and in these instances, a rehabilitation plan will be created to help a person recover fully.Strokes can also cause weakness in the body and, in some cases, paralysis. Physiotherapy will be prescribed if this is the case and a care worker may also be provided.Other issues that may arise after a stroke include: vision problems, bladder issues, difficulty swallowing.Mental health issues, such as depression and anxiety, may also arise after a stroke.For more information about strokes, visit the Stroke Association website, or call the charity’s helpline on 0303 3033 100.The helpline is open Monday, Thursday and Friday from 9am to 5pm, Tuesday and Wednesday from 8am to 6pm, Saturday from 10am to 1pm and is closed on Sunday.

  • Memory Loss: Causes, Diagnosis And Treatment
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    Boldsky

    Memory Loss: Causes, Diagnosis And Treatment

    Do you feel like you have been more absent-minded and forgetful lately? If yes, then there may be a few surprising reasons for your memory loss, apart from a common ailment like Alzheimer's disease. Forgetfulness in normal, we all have it.

  • Coconut Oil For Teeth: Benefits And How To Use It
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    Coconut Oil For Teeth: Benefits And How To Use It

    Taking care of the body is incomplete without proper dental care. Proper care of the teeth is important for a clean and bacteria-free mouth. It helps to prevent infections, tooth decay and cavities. In fact, poor oral health is indirectly linked

  • Father gets tattoo on chest to match son’s heart surgery scar
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    The Independent

    Father gets tattoo on chest to match son’s heart surgery scar

    A father has had a tattoo inked on his chest in tribute to the scar his son sustained during life-saving heart surgery.When Leanne Watts was 28 weeks pregnant with her son, Joey, she was informed he had a rare condition called supravalvular aortic stenosis.The heart defect causes the large vessel which carries blood from the heart to the rest of the body to narrow.On 23 May, six-year-old Joey, from Beverley, East Yorkshire, underwent an eight-hour operation at Leeds Children's Hospital to widen the blood vessel, a procedure which came with a one-in-10 chance of survival.The surgery, which has proven successful for Joey so far, resulted in him acquiring a 9cm scar down the centre of his chest."When Joey saw the scar, he just said, 'Is this where they have cut me to fix my heart?'" Mrs Watts said."We've told him it should be something to be proud of and he shouldn't be ashamed by what has happened to him."All of these warriors should be proud of their scars and all they achieve in life."On 29 May, the day after Joey was discharged from hospital, his father, Martin Watts, went to a local tattoo parlour to have a copy of his son's scar tattooed on his chest.Mr Watts also had his son's heartbeat tattooed on his chest to the right of the scar design. The Watts family are supporting the "ScarSelfie" campaign being promoted by the Children's Heart Surgery Fund (CHSF), which is encouraging patients of heart surgery to share pictures of their scars on social media.The campaign also encourages donations to CHSF, which provides aid to the Leeds Congenital Heart Unit at Leeds Children's Hospital."We fully understand that showing a scar picture is a very personal decision and not for everyone," said Sharon Milner, CEO of CHSF."We are blown away by the bravery and resilience of the hundreds of CHD patients who undergo open-heart surgery and life-saving procedures at the Leeds Congenital Heart Unit every day – like Joey."Joey's older brother, seven-year-old Harley, was diagnosed with the some condition when he was 14 weeks old.Harley is due to undergo the same surgery later this year, while Joey will require three further operations to widen his pulmonary branches and stretch his blood vessels.“You take comfort from the way surgeons at Leeds handled things with Joey,” Ms Watts said. “It will be just as scary but they have given you reason to believe.“I thought superheroes wore capes, they don’t, they wear surgical scrubs and gowns."Supravalvular aortic stenosis is linked to William's Syndrome, a congenital disorder which can cause heart issues.“It’s a very rare condition and is linked to William’s Syndrome. For some reason, the boys don’t have William's Syndrome but they have the heart condition of a child with William’s," Mrs Watts explained.