• Batkid: Boy who became global sensation by saving city five years ago is cancer-free
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    The Independent

    Batkid: Boy who became global sensation by saving city five years ago is cancer-free

    In 2013, five-year-old Miles Scott's dream came true when he was transformed into superhero 'Batkid' for the day, putting his struggles with leukaemia to one side so that he could fight crime on the streets of San Francisco. The adventure was arranged by the Make-A-Wish Foundation, who liaised with the late San Francisco mayor Ed Lee, the San Francisco police and fire departments and baseball team the San Francisco Giants in order to make Miles' wish a reality. With thousands of people around the world inspired by Miles' story and his spirit, the Make-A-Wish Foundation has revealed that the 10-year-old is cancer-free.

  • Makaton: What is the sign language being used by Rob Delaney on CBeebies?
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    The Independent

    Makaton: What is the sign language being used by Rob Delaney on CBeebies?

    Actor Rob Delaney, star of hit comedy Catastrophe, has announced that he's going to be delivering a story on CBeebies Bedtime Stories using Makaton, a version of sign language that he used to communicate with his son Henry. Prior to his son's death, Delaney and the rest of his family used Makaton to converse with Henry, who was unable to speak after undergoing a tracheotomy. “Our family learned Makaton to be able to communicate with our son Henry.

  • What is transcendental meditation?
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    The Independent

    What is transcendental meditation?

    Transcendental meditation is a specific form of silent meditation that originates from India. Unlike other types of meditation, which may require movement or chanting, transcendental meditation is effortless and simply calls on practitioners to think of a mantra and focus on nothing else. The idea is that regularly practising this kind of meditation will allow someone to enter a psychophysiological state of restful alertness, which experts claim can help treat a number of mental health issues, such as depression and anxiety.

  • Adults want children to play with ‘traditional’ toys such as board games and science kits, study finds
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    The Independent

    Adults want children to play with ‘traditional’ toys such as board games and science kits, study finds

    Microscopes, modelling clay and magic kits were among the top toys adults believe children should experience while growing up, according to a study. A poll of 2,000 parents also found many yearn for their kids to ditch their high-tech gadgets and try traditional toys such as chemistry sets, yo-yos and skipping ropes.

  • Celine Dion unveils gender-neutral clothing line for children
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    The Independent

    Celine Dion unveils gender-neutral clothing line for children

    Celine Dion has launched a gender-neutral clothing line for children. In the short film, we see Dion stealthily break into a maternity ward, with male infants on one side and female infants on the other, clad in blue and pink sleepwear, respectively. Dion has partnered with unisex children’s brand NUNUNU for the collection, which features more than 70 items of clothing for children of all ages, with sizes running from infancy up to the age of 14.

  • World Diabetes Day: What causes diabetes, what are the different types and how can it be treated?
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    The Independent

    World Diabetes Day: What causes diabetes, what are the different types and how can it be treated?

    With the number of people with diabetes in the UK doubling over the past two decades, it’s important that people are educated on the symptoms, causes and effects of the chronic condition. There are currently around 3.7 million diagnosed cases of diabetes across the country, with many at risk of developing some forms of the disease due to factors such as childhood obesity. What is diabetes and how is it caused?

  • Bake Off’s Kim-Joy discusses experiencing severe social anxiety as a child
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    The Independent

    Bake Off’s Kim-Joy discusses experiencing severe social anxiety as a child

    Great British Bake Off finalist Kim-Joy Hewlett was undoubtedly one of the highlights of this year’s series, delighting viewers with her creative designs and cheerful demeanour. Having got almost 50,000 followers on Twitter and more than 90,000 on Instagram, the baker is now using her large online platform to open up about a topic with which she has personal experience: mental health issues. As a child, Kim-Joy experienced what she describes as severe social anxiety, refusing to speak to people outside of her home for fear of being rejected by them.

  • How a flesh-eating drug containing paint thinner and phosphorous is causing a global crisis
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    The Independent

    How a flesh-eating drug containing paint thinner and phosphorous is causing a global crisis

    Desomorphine has been in the news a lot lately. There are two reasons for its horrific reputation, one related to desomorphine itself, and the second, to the way the street drug is produced. Desomorphine was actually first synthesised in 1932.

  • Michelle Keegan appeals to women to have smear tests following her own: 'It is so important and so easy'
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    The Independent

    Michelle Keegan appeals to women to have smear tests following her own: 'It is so important and so easy'

    Michelle Keegan has spoken about her experience of having a smear test, assuring women that they shouldn’t fear having the cervical cancer screening done. Many young women avoid having cervical examinations due to body insecurities, according to recent research conducted by the charity Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust. With approximately 3,200 new cases of cervical cancer diagnosed in the UK every year, raising awareness about the importance and ease of having a smear test is essential.

  • How a sausage and bacon tax could save hundreds of thousands of lives every year
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    The Independent

    How a sausage and bacon tax could save hundreds of thousands of lives every year

    Not only is it associated with increased rates of coronary heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes, but there is also convincing evidence that red and processed meat can cause cancer . The cancer agency of the World Health Organisation (WHO) classifies the consumption of red meat, which includes beef, lamb, and pork, as carcinogenic – or having the potential to cause cancer if eaten in processed form. The WHO also classifies red meat as probably carcinogenic – even if eaten unprocessed.

  • Four home remedies that can soothe a winter sore throat
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    The Independent

    Four home remedies that can soothe a winter sore throat

    No, the most irritating symptom of all is a painful sore throat that makes it difficult to swallow, eat or drift off to sleep. Waking up with a prickly throat can be an indicator that a cold virus has penetrated the immune system. The reason you begin to feel like you’ve eaten an extra-hot portion of Vindaloo is because viruses cause inflammation in the body, particularly in the tonsils or lining of the throat.

  • How WWI played a key role shaping plastic surgery and modern anaesthesia
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    The Independent

    How WWI played a key role shaping plastic surgery and modern anaesthesia

    In response, during the four years of the war, military surgeons developed new techniques on the battlefield and in supporting hospitals, which, in the war’s final two years, resulted in more survivors of injuries that would have proved mortal in the first two. On the western front, 1.6 million British soldiers were successfully treated and returned to the trenches. Historically, this was an area where very little had been attempted, and survivors with major facial injuries were left with major deformities that made it difficult to see, breathe easily, or eat and drink.

  • Experts give their top tips for running during winter, from wearing the right clothes to regulating your breathing
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    The Independent

    Experts give their top tips for running during winter, from wearing the right clothes to regulating your breathing

    Warming up before exercise is always important, but even more so when your muscles are at risk of becoming especially tight in low temperatures. Furthermore, you may need to invest in reflective clothing if running during the early or late hours so that drivers on the road are aware of your whereabouts. The Independent spoke to several experts for their top tips on running during winter.

  • Not getting enough sleep? Drinking more water could help you
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    The Independent

    Not getting enough sleep? Drinking more water could help you

    Many people don’t get enough sleep, with a recent study claiming that the average Briton gets just six hours of shut-eye a night. Reasons for sleepless nights vary and are often linked to underlying psychological issues, but a new study claims that it could be down to simply not having drunk enough water the day before. According to research carried out by academics at Penn State University, Pennsylvania, people who slept for six hours a night had significantly more concentrated urine and were more dehydrated compared to those who regularly slept eight hours a night, which is the recommended amount.

  • Drinking coffee could reduce risk of Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s, scientists claim
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    The Independent

    Drinking coffee could reduce risk of Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s, scientists claim

    Regularly drinking coffee could decrease your risk of developing Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s disease later on in life, a study has claimed. While many people rely on their morning cup of Joe for a much-needed boost of energy, the research conducted by scientists at the Krembil Brain Institute in Canada highlights the beneficial impact that coffee consumption can also have on one’s overall health. The researchers used light roasted, dark roasted and decaffeinated dark roasted coffee to carry out their investigation.

  • Six ways social media negatively affects your mental health
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    The Independent

    Six ways social media negatively affects your mental health

    The rise of social media has meant that we as a global population are more connected than we have ever been in the history of time. While social media platforms can have their benefits, using them too frequently can make you feel increasingly unhappy and isolated in the long run. The constant barrage of perfectly filtered photos that appear on Instagram are bound to knock many people’s self-esteem, while obsessively checking your Twitter feed just before bed could be contributing towards poor quality of sleep.

  • Mother shares photo of son with measles to convince parents to vaccinate their children
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    The Independent

    Mother shares photo of son with measles to convince parents to vaccinate their children

    A mother is urging other parents to have their children vaccinated after her own eight-month-old son was diagnosed with measles. Kiora Pen shared the plea on Facebook alongside a photo of her rash-covered son Marshall, who was diagnosed with the infectious viral disease on Monday. “Public Health England have called me this morning to confirm, after analysing his swab, Marshall is suffering with measles,” Pen wrote.

  • Identical twin sisters give birth to daughters on same night, less than two hours apart
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    Kristine Solomon

    Identical twin sisters give birth to daughters on same night, less than two hours apart

    Bao Nhia Julia Yang and Bao Kou Julie Yang are identical twins who gave birth to their daughters less than two hours apart on Sunday night.

  • Seasonal affective disorder: What is it and how can you treat it?
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    The Independent

    Seasonal affective disorder: What is it and how can you treat it?

    Cue seasonal affective disorder (SAD): a type of depression that typically arises as we head into frostier climes. Sometimes known as “winter depression”, SAD can be debilitating, leaving sufferers with a number of psychological symptoms, including irritability and a persistent low mood, as its acronym would suggest. SAD is a form of depression that people experience during a particular time of year, usually winter, though some sufferers may experience it in the summer months.

  • How moving to another country could upset your gut bacteria
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    The Independent

    How moving to another country could upset your gut bacteria

    To try to understand this phenomenon from a health perspective, researchers from the University of Minnesota conducted a large, in-depth study of Chinese and Thai immigrants moving to the US. The authors looked at the diet, gut microbes and body mass index of the immigrants before and after they moved. The evidence showed that the longer immigrants spent in the US, the less diverse their bacteria became, and that this was linked to rising obesity.

  • How electricity could be the new medicine
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    The Independent

    How electricity could be the new medicine

    Medicine is getting radical, and one of the radical new approaches for treating disease is electricity. Well, everything you do, from walking to dreaming, is controlled or regulated by electrical signals. The hub of electrical activity is in the brain, and from there the nerves branch out to all corners of the body.

  • Smartphones ‘causing mental health problems in two-year-olds’
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    The Independent

    Smartphones ‘causing mental health problems in two-year-olds’

    After just one hour of screen time, children and adolescents may have less curiosity, lower self-control and lower emotional stability, which can lead to an increased risk of anxiety and depression, claims a US study published in the journal Preventive Medicine Reports. The researchers found that those aged 14 to 17 are more at risk for such adverse effects, but noticed the correlations in younger children and toddlers, whose brains are still developing, as well. The study found that nursery school children who used screens frequently were twice as likely to lose their temper.

  • Synaesthesia: The condition which means you can 'taste' sounds and 'hear' colours
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    The Independent

    Synaesthesia: The condition which means you can 'taste' sounds and 'hear' colours

    Which colour it is? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, you might be one of the few people with synaesthesia: a neurological condition that causes the brain to combine senses that wouldn’t otherwise be linked. While a regular person listens to music and hears a song, a synaesthete may listen to music and see a colour, or eat a steak and hear a sound.

  • These will be the most popular baby names 10 years from now
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    Cosmo

    These will be the most popular baby names 10 years from now

    Surprisingly, they're not that futuristic.