Taylor Kitsch says he's proud of 'streaming resurgence' of legendary flop 'John Carter'

Ben Arnold
Contributor
Taylor Kitsch in John Carter (Credit: Disney)

Because Disney's infamous 2012 sci-fi actioner John Carter was one of the most expensive films ever made, when no one went to see it at the cinema, it became one of the biggest flops of all time.

Intended to be the first in a series of movies based on the pulp writer Edgar Rice Burroughs' series of novels based on the titular hero, a Confederate civil war captain transported to Mars to embark on derring-do, this plan was quickly abandoned.

The movie, in which Taylor Kitsch played the lead, cost a staggering $306 million, but made $284 million.

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Add on the cost of marketing and whatnot, and it lost the studio $200 million.

But now Kitsch reckons that the movie is having a 'resurgence' thanks to streaming platforms, and is now actually quite proud of it.

Taylor Kitsch attends the UK premiere of John Carter at The BFI Southbank on March 1, 2012 in London, England. (Credit: Dave Hogan/Getty Images)

Asked if it was getting the props he thinks it is now entitled to, he told The Hollywood Reporter: “I think it got another life when it went on Netflix not long ago, maybe a year ago or something, but, yes, to be blunt.

“People stop me all the time for that, especially in Europe. It’s had a little mini-resurgence. Maybe, at the time, it was more of a knee-jerk reaction of ‘Let’s see how we can bury this and everyone that has a part in it.’

He went on: “Over time, I think you take a breath and understand that it is what it is... I guess people who watch it now for the first time can take a lot more away from it than people did at first.

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“It’s always flattering, and I learned a ton on that movie. I honestly don’t see it as a failure. I have great memories from it, and I still talk to a bunch of the cast. It is what it is, right?”

To be fair, Kitsch, who was best known for his role in sports drama Friday Night Lights at the time, and whose leading man break then faltered somewhat, has championed the movie for years, ever since it came out.

He told Variety back in 2014: “My biggest regret would have been if I didn’t do enough personally. If I didn’t give it everything I had. If I hadn’t prepped enough. I don’t have that regret, so that allows me to let go.

“I know the second script was f**king awesome. We had to plant a grounding, so we could really take off in the second one. The second one was even more emotionally taxing, which was awesome.”

Shame we'll never see it.