These are the five most pro-Trump areas of the UK

Victoria Bell
·4-min read
FLORIDA, USA - NOVEMBER 2: US President Donald Trump holds a rally to address his supporters at Miami-Opa Locka Executive Airport in Miami, Florida, United States on November 2, 2020. (Photo by Eva Marie Uzcategui Trinkl/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)
President Donald Trump at an election rally in Miami, Florida. (Getty)

As the US election race enters its final hours, a poll has found the vast majority of Brits would elect Joe Biden over Donald Trump.

While voters in America prepare to decide whether Trump remains in the White House for another four years, a Politico poll by Hanbury Strategy shows that not one British constituency would back the incumbent president if given a vote in tomorrow’s election.

It found that in the UK, only 24% of people would vote for Trump, while 76% would vote for Democrat Party nominee Joe Biden.

A man wearing an orange prison outfit and a Donald Trump mask during a protest against U.S. President Donald Trump UK visit to attend the NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organisation) summit on the 3rd December 2019 in London in the United Kingdom. Ahead of a British national election on 12th December 2019, Stop Trump Coalition and CND, (Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament) organised a protest to target a banquet at Buckingham Palace where Trump will dine with the Queen and other NATO leaders. The U.K. is hosting NATO summit to mark the military alliance's 70th anniversary. (photo by Sam Mellish / In Pictures via Getty Images)
A protester during Trump's UK visit to attend the Nato summit in London on 3 December, 2019. (Getty Images)

Some 65% of Tory voters and 88% of Labour voters would back Biden, the poll found.

The company gathered responses from 3,991 British voters between 9 and 15 October to calculate estimated results for each parliamentary constituency in Great Britain.

According to the poll, the five most pro-Trump areas are Great Grimsby, Castle Point, Hull East, Basildon South and Thurrock East, and Kingston upon Hull West and Hessle.

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Even in Great Grimsby, Britain’s most pro-Trump constituency area, only 32.7% of voters would choose Trump over Biden.

The percentages of Trump supporters in Castle Point, Hull East, Basildon South and Thurrock East, and Kingston upon Hull West and Hessle are all around the 31% mark.

The five most pro-Biden seats are East Dunbartonshire, Edinburgh South, Dulwich and West Norwood, Brighton Pavilion, and Hornsey and Wood Green.

Britain's Queen Elizabeth II (3rd R) speaks with NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg (3rd L), US First Lady Melania Trump (L) and US President Donald Trump (2nd L), Britain's Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall (R) and Britain's Prince Charles, Prince of Wales (2nd R) in Buckingham Palace in central London on December 3, 2019, during a reception hosted by Britain's Queen Elizabeth II ahead of the NATO alliance summit. - NATO leaders gather Tuesday for a summit to mark the alliance's 70th anniversary but with leaders feuding and name-calling over money and strategy, the mood is far from festive. (Photo by Geoff PUGH / POOL / AFP) (Photo by GEOFF PUGH/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)
The Queen meets the Trumps, alongside Nato secretary general Jens Stoltenberg, the Duchess of Cornwall and Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, in Buckingham Palace in 2019. (Getty)

Hanbury Strategy partner James Kanagasooriam, who led the research, told Politico: “Supporters from each of the main British political parties are overwhelmingly in favour of Joe Biden winning.

“The results suggest that US culture wars don’t translate neatly across when they are imported to the UK.”

Kanagasooriam also said the research shows the “extreme damage to America’s standing in the world” caused by Trump.

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The President is a controversial figure gaining global media coverage for his divisive policies, Twitter spats and contentious remarks.

While he may have garnered a strong following in the US, a YouGov poll in 2019 ahead of his first state visit to the UK, showed that just 19% of Brits had a positive opinion of him.

PHILADELPHIA, PA  NOVEMBER 1:  Former Vice President and presidential nominee Joe Biden speaks during a drive in event at Sharon Baptist Church in Philadelphia, PA on November 1, 2020.  (Photo by Demetrius Freeman/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Some 76% of British people prefer Democrat Party nominee Joe Biden. (Getty)

Ahead of the visit, thousands took to the streets at demonstrations that saw giant projections and a mini baby Trump blimp popping up across the city.

Trump’s UK visit was marred by controversy as he criticised Theresa May for her handing of Brexit and attacked London mayor Sadiq Khan, calling him a “stone cold loser”.

Just before he landed at Stansted Airport, Trump tweeted: “Sadiq Khan, who by all accounts has done a terrible job as Mayor of London, has been foolishly 'nasty' to the visiting President of the United States, by far the most important ally of the United Kingdom.

The President’s visit came ahead of last year’s General Election in December, in which Boris Johnson won with a considerable majority.

Johnson has always called Trump a “good friend”, but now Johnson may be trying to open a new relationship with Joe Biden, who is leading in the polls.

Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab is said to have recently met with Democratic Senator Chris Coons, a confidant of Biden, tipped as a leading candidate to be Biden's secretary of state if he wins the presidential election.

According to the Business Insider, one UK government minister who represented the general feeling in Johnson's Conservative Party said: “It is like a TV show that has run its course. People are bored of it.”

"They're writing off Trump in No. 10 now," a senior Conservative Party aide told The Sunday Times.

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