Time Out becomes ‘Time In’: Magazine rebrands itself

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The magazine was believed to have been launched in 1968, to let readers know everything about the cultural and recreational offerings in the city of London. (Source: Twitter/@TimeOutLondon)

In the wake of the COVID-19 outbreak, governments all around the world are stressing on the need to implement social distancing, in order to prevent any further spread of the novel coronavirus. People are being asked to stay inside, so they do not contract the disease and do not risk spreading it to the more vulnerable section of the society.

And to drive this message across in the most novel of ways (no pun intended), the London-based Time Out magazine — essentially a food, drink and entertainment listings magazine — has rebranded itself. It now goes by the name of 'Time In', emphasising on the need to take on the situation more pro-actively, and staying inside. In fact, the magazine has even stopped its print run, after the health crisis forced readers to vacate the streets.

About the magazine

The magazine is believed to have been launched in 1968, to let readers know everything about the cultural and recreational offerings in the city of London. It was handed out to readers at the public transport hubs, and in cafes and pubs for free. The group was then expanded to some 328 cities around the world.

On March 23, it was decided that with a majority of people staying at home, it would be best to keep operations digital-only, and to show readers the ways in which they can support local businesses. Some current themes include "Time In Daily" and "The best of the city — straight to your sofa".

Time Out’s Global Editor-in-Chief Caroline McGinn told the international press that in these "unprecedented times", the magazine "will continue to bring the best of the city to Londoners and to celebrate its diversity, spirit and resilience, which are so apparent in this crisis". "We’re here to document that as Time In until it’s time to go out again," she said.

Meanwhile, the total number of deaths from the coronavirus pandemic has crossed 15,000 across the globe, with a majority — 9,197 — from Europe. Italy is the hardest-hit country with 5,476 deaths, followed by China where the virus first emerged last year with 3,270, and Spain with 2,182.